A tanda for...

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by tangobro, Dec 23, 2012.

  1. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    not so arcane, but definitely an art.
    sixela likes this.
  2. sixela

    sixela Active Member

    What do you mean, not arcane? I don't think you need to have lived in Buenos Aires for your entire life span to tango, but I'm not yet that sure about whether that isn't necessary to be really good at piropos...
  3. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    Piropos are common, not arcane, in the Spanish speaking neighborhoods of New York City. Granted "really good" is being accomplished in the art, don't know if men in Bs.As. have an exclusive lock on that.
  4. sixela

    sixela Active Member

    I'll grant you that. But it's still arcane to a North-European, though most certainly not to a Neapolitan or Sicilian ;-).
  5. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    An Argentine DJ, played a D'Arienzo tanda which included Mandria, followed by Trago Amargo.

    If you dj, what would you play preceeding or following these 2 songs to complete the tanda?

    If you don't DJ, what would you like to hear preceeding or following these 2 songs to complete the tanda?

  6. UKDancer

    UKDancer Well-Known Member

    How about:

    Que Dios te Ayude


    and Santa Milonguita


    so all from 1939.
  7. sixela

    sixela Active Member

    Depends on the audience. I'd be tempted not to stick to 1939, e.g. with something from 1938 but in a bit more lyrical, Olvidame, and then ending with Pensalo Bien. Or I could change into '40s d'Arienzo in the last track just to change the rhythm and play something a bit more challenging and playful, like Corrientes y Esmeralda (if only for the little wailing violin moments).

    What's going to come after this tanda?

    I'm far too whimsical to come up with just one suggestion and then stick to my guns.

    Of course, that's just to do things differently from UKdancer, whose tanda also works (but only if the dancers are up to the incessant drive of 4 successive 1939 D'Arienzo compás machines.)
  8. UKDancer

    UKDancer Well-Known Member

    They can wait until later in the night and then I'll give them some D'Arienzo con Mauré.
  9. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    UKDancer's tanda for D'Arienzo would produce a souindscape something like this:

    Mandria


    Trago Amargo


    The actual soundscape will vary depending on the background noise, cortina, preceeding & following tandas.
  10. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    *ignorant question* How does one tanda influence the one that follows it? I thought that each was more or less self-contained and that the DJ gets t choose, based n his/her preferences and the energy of the crowd.
  11. sixela

    sixela Active Member

    Just to show that it all depends on the audience, let's just say that I'd be inclined to use UKDancer's tanda if people were dancing as in vid #1 or #4 (or the original video, where I might actually go for even more extreme compás machines), but not if they were dancing as in vid #2 or #3.
  12. sixela

    sixela Active Member

    Yes, but the end of one tanda does set up the next one (either by gently announcing a nudge towards it, or, if e.g. you're switching from tango to milonga or vals, through contrast, if e.g. you finish with lyrical fireworks just before giving people valses and something sweet and delicate afterwards, or finish with lyrical fireworks, some playful milongas, and then some more light and playful stuff again. Onlt tow examples, lots of possibilities)

    Hard to explain and _very_ personal. I guess that's what makes all DJs different.
  13. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Ah. Makes sense. :)
  14. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    sixela's tanda for D'Arienzo would produce a soundscape something like this:

    Olvidame


    Mandria


    Trago Amargo


    Piensalo Bien


    or with the alternative ending

    Corrientes y Esmeralda
  15. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    As UKDancer & sixela's tandas for D'Arienzo illustrate, the 1st song in the tanda typically is the flag that alerts the dancers to the tempo & style of the dances to follow. The other choices produce the varying levels of energy the dancers feel within the tanda. It may be easier, if you are not familiar with the music, to be aware of the differing energy levels in a real milonga where you can see the dancers.

    caveat - a few dancers in milongas around here will almost dance the same regardless of the music. It's more like - hey guys watch this cool move I can make her do! Now watch this one!!
    sixela and pygmalion like this.
  16. sixela

    sixela Active Member

    Listening to it, I think I'll take the 'Pensalo Bien', unless I'm going to more lyrical stuff after this tanda.

    I like the Biagi 'kicker' it gives the tanda, which actually goes opposite to the mood change in the singing (I think this track was one of the last that still has Biagi on piano, and I always sorely miss him on the 1939 records).
  17. sixela

    sixela Active Member

    I think the dancers to 'Mandria' in the post about UKDancer's tanda illustrate your point fairly well, unfortunately, which is why I'd be tempted to change tack, since I have to be inspired by what the dancers _do_ with the music to keep going. I'd certainly _not_ end the tanda with those dancers on Pensalo Bien.

    They need less energy, and perhaps a D'agostino/Vargas tanda after this if I still want challenge them (just to see who's going to keep on steamrolling through the nuances of the music and who isn't), or a Caló or Di Sarli/Rufino if I'm willing to give them something that lets them all continue to dance this way and not make me gnash my teeth. See, I'd do something different if I was in a lenient mood or not ;-).

    It's all a matter of taste, of course. My gut feelings are only my own.

    Another DJ could well find that dancers in that Taipei video are perfectly fine on that D'Arienzo, but there's something that rubs _me_ the wrong way. But perhaps it's also the setting, and if they had actually been dancing a good tanda (like UKDancer's) instead of just this one track they'd dance very differently. [Which leads me to discuss a point that someone else brought up recently, saying that DJs are deluded in carressing their egos if they think they have an influence on how the dancers dance. I do think they have an influence and even a responsibility...]

    It was, of course, extra cruel of tangobro to post a video with Carlitos & Noelia dancing on the same track just somewhat later.
  18. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    Alfredo DeAngelis
    (played by Gabriel Misse, the guest DJ @ a recent New York City milonga). *

    Atenti Pebeta


    Chorra


    Jiron Porteno


    * yes that Gabriel Misse. He also performed with Analia Centurion. He said he was playing music in the style of the Argentine milongas, including Rock & Roll, Salsa, Cumbia & Merengue.

    Gabriel & Analia - Rock & Roll:
  19. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    Gabriel also did something I have not seen done at other New York City milongas, which I assume is done in some milongas in Argentina, he announced the orchestra before starting the tanda. In the case of an alternative to tango music, he announced the genre - for example - announcing "Salsa".
  20. tangobro

    tangobro Active Member

    a tanda for:
    Carlos DiSarli
    (played by the dj @ a recent New York City milonga)

    Duelo Criollo


    La Capilla Blanca


    Patotero Sentimental


    Porteno y Bailarin

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