Barrel Roll

Discussion in 'Ballroom Dance' started by DanceMentor, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. DanceMentor

    DanceMentor Administrator

    Edita in her video refers to a "barrel roll" which seems to include a heel turn to the left for the lady's part. Anyone have any info on the technique or a video showing it?
     
  2. GJB

    GJB Well-Known Member

    Barrel roll? Sounds like a move from Country Western dancing (UCWDC) or WCS. I haven't seen anything similar in Ballroom and what I have seen would not be done in Standard.
     
  3. Larinda McRaven

    Larinda McRaven Site Moderator Staff Member

    It is a smooth move.

    Edita who?
    What video?
    What pattern?
     
  4. Sagitta

    Sagitta Well-Known Member

    I've done the barrel roll in cha cha cha, swing and salsa. Same questions as Larinda, in what dance and pattern are you referring to.
     
    Larinda McRaven likes this.
  5. DanceMentor

    DanceMentor Administrator

    Edita Danuite
     
  6. Larinda McRaven

    Larinda McRaven Site Moderator Staff Member

    In Standard ? :eek:
     
  7. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    A term used in American style Samba ( way back when ) .
     
  8. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    In a barrel roll either of you turns simultaneously round his own axis. And when you hold your hands above your heads while turning, your upper bodies will lean towards each other. This looks a bit like wine barrels wobbling along the hoop of their slim edge. Barrel rolls would fit to casino, bolero, zouk, and samba. But I´ve also seen them in lindy.
     
  9. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    exactly..Except Bolero..totally out of character
     
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  10. opendoor

    opendoor Well-Known Member

    uuuuuups, sorry for comitting ad blunder o_O
     
  11. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    Oy... the thread title put me in mind of airplanes, and I thought, "How in the world do you do that?" :confused:
     
  12. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    A barrel roll came up once in an open-level quickstep class I took. I'm trying to decide how to describe it over the internet -- not sure how I'll do, but imagine repeated pivots in roughly the same spot on the floor. I think: for either partner, when taking a forward step with R, one's belt buckle faces the ceiling to the extent possible. When taking a backward step with L, it faces the floor to the extent possible.

    Does that make sense at all? Of course it's not a formal technical description; sorry.
     
  13. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    The description makes sense... I'm just trying to imagine myself actually doing such a thing and not breaking my back... :eek:
     
  14. Larinda McRaven

    Larinda McRaven Site Moderator Staff Member

    I would call that a samba roll.
    In a barrel the couples turn back to back... can't really do that in standard.
     
  15. DL

    DL Well-Known Member


    The QS step I'm thinking of is much like a samba roll, but doesn't travel. I could have sworn it was called a barrel roll, but then again it was years ago and I saw it only once.
     
  16. Leon Theou

    Leon Theou Active Member

    is it a tumble turn? I saw a commentated comp video... I think it was a WDSF championship of some sort. A couple did a figure that looked like a stationary samba roll, and the commentator said something about tumble turns.
     
  17. DL

    DL Well-Known Member

    Now that you say it, that does ring a bell. OK, in that light, sorry for the digression.
     
  18. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    No.. not remotely like a " barrell" turn. The " Tumble " turn ,was popular in F/trot back in the early 90s .
     
  19. vit

    vit Active Member

    In Waltz also - popular variation was Quick open reverse from PP, tumble turn and thr. oversway or left whisk etc (I still like it). However, I don't find it to be similar to reverse roll in samba either
     
  20. tangotime

    tangotime Well-Known Member

    I used to teach it primarily in F/trot.

    me neither..
     

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