Boleo, not Voleo

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by larrynla, Jan 15, 2009.

  1. larrynla

    larrynla Member

    I sometimes see the word boleo misspelled as voleo. This is as bad a mistake as confusing to, too, and two.

    Boleo comes from the verb bolear, to throw. The verb is also the root of bolo, the gaucho lariat made of three lengths of rope tied together and weighted at the free ends with a stone or other weight. Gauchos throw it sideways and it wraps around the target, capturing it. Boleo may have been inspired by the word bolo, since a boleo is lead by reversing an ocho, causing the follower to wrap her free leg around her knee.

    Voleo comes from the verb volear, to volley, punch, or strike, especially with a racquet, paddle, or open hand as in volleyball.

    The misspelling is an easy one for someone who speaks Spanish, since B and V are pronounced exactly the same. S and Z are also pronounced the same, which is why you sometimes see the Zotto brothers (whose name is Italian) referred to as the Soto brothers.

    Larry de Los Angeles
     
  2. newbie

    newbie Active Member

    Boleo as a noun does not exist at all except in a tango context. Ergo there is no correct or incorrect way to spell it.
     
  3. Heather2007

    Heather2007 New Member

    European Spaniards pronounce their B as a V and vice versa depending upon the terrority of Spain from where they're from (i.e. Basque Territory spanish compared to other areas of Spain). E.g. the word "Valencia" (a Spainis town) is pronounced and sometimes written "Balencia" by some Spaniards. So it is understandable that non-Spanish speaking people will write phonetically what it is that they are hearing. And so for a Spaniard to see word Boleo written as Voleo wouldn't be considered a Commandment broken. I don't know if it is same for the (Spanish-speaking) South Americans.
     
  4. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    I agree. Personally I make a sound that is between "b" and "v" when pronouncing something like "voleo" (if I am in Spain that is, otherwise I wouldnt be pedantic).

    I have been watching some Homer Ladas videos recently , and I notice he pronounces "ocho" as "O-cho" (as in capital O -cho). Is this common in the US? I find it very peculiar.
     
  5. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    If you are in Essex you will hear them pronounced as "Ochers" ( estuary english)
     
  6. kieronneedscake

    kieronneedscake New Member

    Just for you Larry, I would rename my thread since it distresses you. However, my editing privileges for my own post have disappeared over night.

    Ironically, the volley connotation may have meaning too, i.e. hitting something in mid-air before it has a chance to bounce. Punting other dancers from the pista!
     
  7. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    I'm in Kent so that's down the estuary and turn slightly to the right :)

    PS And Cha'hum's in Kent as well
     
  8. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    I know it well, at least the Medway & the docks, ( Gawd, luvvaduck)
     
  9. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    Was that from your Army experiences during the Falklands War? :cool:
     
  10. Heather2007

    Heather2007 New Member

    In much the say way when I'm listening to political news the American reporters will pronounce the word Iran as "I-Ran" or Moscow as "Mos-Cow". (The natives on the other of course would pronounced these words as: "Oh-choh", Eeerr-rrun and Mosk-voh.:raisebro:) After all, we do live in a Tower of Babel situation when it comes to Tangospeak and no matter how its pronounced be it with a Vee or a Bee we understand perfectly what it is that person's saying.

    Whew, the presh-ush-ness of the dance eh?;)
     
    opendoor likes this.
  11. Heather2007

    Heather2007 New Member

    And here in the Sarf East - the word "Mangetout" suddenly becomes a "mangie-tout"
     
  12. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    You're quite right - I'll stop being so anal ....:)
     
  13. Zoopsia59

    Zoopsia59 Well-Known Member

    My personal favorite American mispronunciation is Sow-cow (or just "sow") for the figure skating jump "Salchow"

    But I'm not understanding the difference in "Oh-choh" and "O-cho" (as pronunciation) that 2 of you have written. To me, these two phonetic spellings would be pronounced the same.
     
  14. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    Hi Zoopsia

    "ocho" in Spanish starts with a sound like the "o" in "on" but with more expulsion of air

    does that help?
     
  15. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    it gets more confusing in Wales where "Ch" is pronounced like you wish to remove a fishbone lodged in your throat. ;)
     
  16. Zoopsia59

    Zoopsia59 Well-Known Member

    Ah Wales... The Land that Vowels Forgot.

    Need to start a charity... Vowels for Wales..
     
  17. Zoopsia59

    Zoopsia59 Well-Known Member

    Not really, because the word "on" is pronounced different ways in various parts of the US (ahn, own, un....)
     
  18. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    Hah! That's why language teaching on the Internet is never going to work ...

    Homer's (US?) version : http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=fgkbisJOpPM

    then an authentic Spanish* version of the word :

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSFw10k-eLA&feature=PlayList&p=D81336F792BFFC6F&playnext=1&index=16


    (had to search around a bit for videos where they actually pronounce the word rather than show the movement, but finally got there!)

    * sorry , that should be "Castillano" - I know I know ...
     
  19. bafonso

    bafonso New Member

    well, on without the nasal sound. It's an hola without the "h" sound basically. ocho is an 8. Just see listen to anyone speaking spanish saying 8.
     
  20. bafonso

    bafonso New Member

    I'm sorry but the only persons misspelling Valencia would be kindergarten kids. Replacing the V with a B is common also in parts of the north of Portugal and everyone knows how to spell. It is NOT acceptable to replace Vs and Bs, let's stop this nonsense. What lead you to think so? To a lot of persons in the basque region, castellano is their second language... most of spain can't say v. But they can spell and voleo will not make sense to them.
     

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