close or open embrace

Discussion in 'Tango Argentino' started by aqua, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Funnily enough I was discussing this last night with a woman who'd just come back from a year in BA.

    In CE I much prefer a bit "too heavy" to a bit "too light" a connection. In fact, I'd rather have "much too heavy" than "a bit too light".

    In OE, it's different - the lady has to be on her own axis, so a lighter follow helps me.
  2. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    No.

    In this country, whenever someone says "private class", that means a 1-to-1 session. That's the way everyone always interprets the phrase in my experience, in all dance forms.

    Feel free to use your own interpretation of that phrase, but be aware you're in disagreement with the way that the rest of the UK uses it.
  3. spectator

    spectator Member


    Brilliant npml...
  4. Captain Jep

    Captain Jep New Member

    why thank you young miss ....

    ps what's npml? :)
  5. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Just to clarify--when you talk about a follower being "heavy" versus "light," I assume you are talking about the strength of the connection, not a "heavy follower" in the sense of being unresponsive and not carrying her own weight such that you end up with a sore back/neck/shoulder/arms/whatever. Correct?
  6. chanchan

    chanchan Member

    I have been dancing for four years, and since I was a beginner I noticed I never had that kind of problem when dancing apilado, but when dancing in axis i first needed to adquire enough proficiency before being able to know where my partern has the weight, and still I have problems if she is too light. So I say that it is more difficult, I repeat: not impossible, just more difficult.
    We are talking about difficulty, not superiority of a style over another.
  7. dchester

    dchester Moderator Staff Member

    His terminology also is in disagreement with the way most of the US uses it.
  8. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Yes :)
  9. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Well I can only speak with authority about the use of terminology in my country. :D
  10. chrisjj

    chrisjj New Member

    > In this country, whenever someone says "private class", that means a
    > 1-to-1 session.

    This thread has shown you that's untrue.

    > That's the way everyone always interprets the phrase in my experience

    I don't doubt it. But to many outside your experience, class means this

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/class .

    To you, class clearly means the same as lesson. Fine - that USA-originating usage is certainly spreading - but I suggest denying the predominant usage does not help.
  11. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Sounds like my kind of leader! I love dancing with a guy who will accept "a lot of connection" from my end, and who will match it. Love love love it. I don't care for it when guys are feather light, or who will back off when I try to establish a firm/"heavy" connection. (I will say, though, that learning to have that strong connection took me a good bit of time. I was so wary of being heavy, as in unresponsive or needing to be forced into moving, or of leaning that I tended to back off. It took me a while to realize that it was completely possible to have a strong/"heavy" connection and still move on my own, with power.)

    Would you care to dance?
  12. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    Apart from you, can you point to someone else who thinks that a private class is not a 1-2-1 class?

    Yes, the terms are pretty much interchangeable for purposes of communications. But then I've only been involved in professional communications for a living for 20 years, so I'm no expert.

    Oh wait. I am an expert.

    I suggest you prove your assertion that there's a verifiable difference between the way people use "class" and "lesson" in everyday usage.

    Oh wait. You can't.
  13. chrisjj

    chrisjj New Member

    > His terminology also is in disagreement with the way most of the US uses it.

    So if in US a couple says "We're having a private class with teacher X", what does it mean??

    I guess you can't be saying like David that it's a one-to-one session...
  14. Dave Bailey

    Dave Bailey New Member

    I'll admit it took me a while to realise that the energy offered in the connection must be matched (by both partners). If it's not, one of us may fall over :)

    Yeah - it seems to be a common problem with followers who've had a lot of experience in other dance forms. They tend to zoom off at the slightest touch, which loses the connection.

    I'm not going over to America, it's full of foreigners. :p
  15. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    Uh, excuse me, it's pronounced "furr'nurs.";):p:D
  16. bordertangoman

    bordertangoman Well-Known Member

    worse than that its full of Americans, too.;)
  17. chrisjj

    chrisjj New Member

    > I suggest you prove your assertion that there's a verifiable difference
    > between the way people use "class" and "lesson" in everyday usage.

    One involved in professional communications for so long should know the impossibility and futility of such proofs.

    For demonstration I'd rather rely on your common sense, so I'll ask you the same question as I asked dchester.

    You're saying

    In this country, whenever someone says "private class", that means a 1-to-1 session


    but if a couple told you "We're having a private class with teacher X", what does it mean?
  18. Zoopsia59

    Zoopsia59 Well-Known Member

    I'm probably going to regret this, and frankly, I think this conversation has gone beyond silly, so I'm not sure why I'm taking the bait... I must be hungry.

    But to me a Private Class means an agreed upon time slot of instruction arranged specifically with a teacher for any given number of people that is not open to public registration or attendanceand in which no one other than those who made the prior arrangements can participate or "drop in".

    The number of people is irrelevant, but is more than one. It is most likely small, but can be quite large, as in the case where my partner and i taught a class at a large private birthday party as a treat for the guests from the hosts. It was a "private class" in every sense of the term.

    To me a on-on-one is a "lesson". I have had private instruction in a variety of disciplines from music, to dance, to skating, to help with scholastics. I never refered to them as a "class" because in my mind, "the class" refers as much to the people in it as it does to the instruction. It implies more than one person or in the case of dancing, one couple who are there together. One person is not a "class". You can however call something a "class" that only one person attends if the intention was to have more. Holding a class and having only one person show up doesn't mean it wasn't supposed to be a class.

    And just as "class" refers to the students as well as the event, "the lesson" also refers to the material as well as the event.

    So really, they're all just words, and as long as we clear up miscommunications that arise form the rather frustrating lack of consensus in languages as common as English, does it really F'*#&@*) matter who is "right"?

    So class, today's lesson is: Can't we all just get along?
  19. dchester

    dchester Moderator Staff Member

    We were all having a delightful conversation on the difference between a class and a lesson, along with what a Private means (and other fascinating semantics), and then you want to hijack the thread and talk about Tango.

    Isn't there a tango forum some place, where you could have those discussions?
  20. AndaBien

    AndaBien Well-Known Member

    Yes, please. I'm discussing topics here because I want to learn more about tango, not because I want to prove a semantic point. I belong to no linquistic forums and I'm not interested.

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