Dile Que No vs. CBL

Discussion in 'Salsa' started by GTO Bruin, Feb 23, 2007.

  1. Ron Obvious

    Ron Obvious New Member

    Hmm, I really don't see a difference between these two sombreros, except that maybe the second one is ended with a more standard dile que no. The only difference in timing is that the first one is danced on3 and the second one on1 (whilst both of course being casino).

    A lot of cubans dance the rueda on3, and that's what always causes problems when we try to dance a rueda with many people in it. The leader is usually cuban, so we dance on3, but then finnish people join, and they join on1. And that's when the **** hits the fan.
  2. MacMoto

    MacMoto Active Member

    I assume you are comparing Danish Guy's Sombrero vid with the vid devane posted here:
    Devane's: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=839lMndQitA
    DG's: http://www.billqvist.de/single/sombrero.avi

    Yes they are similar, and I've seen both versions done in Rueda, but there *is* a clear difference. As DG says, in the vid he posted, the move is prepped on the 8. The leader is doing a hand swap at this point and giving the follower's right hand a pull forward, which makes her take a step *forward* on the 1 as opposed to the usual back break on the 1 seen in devane's video (OK it's on the 3 in devane's vid but you know what I mean). Both versions work, but the step forward on the 1 makes the move much easier for the follower to follow. In devane's vid, the follower is turning in place first then starting the walk to swap places with the leader (making it look a bit like a hybrid of slot and cuban styles). In DG's vid, because the follower starts her walk early (turning and walking at the same time), by the 3 the two dancers have already swapped positions. This version feels less rushed as a result.

    As for the other vid from devane (which he did not post here -- he PMed it to some of us), it's completely different. As DG says, it shows the sombrero arm move done in the slot (crossbody) style, not Cuban style.
  3. Ron Obvious

    Ron Obvious New Member

    Ok, I now see what you mean, I guess I didn't think so much on the details. The video posted by DG surely looks more like the way our teachers do it, but if you watch a (beginners) rueda class there is so much personal variation anyway, to which I guess I attributed the differene.
  4. tj

    tj New Member

    I think you've hit the nail on the head here. We're pretty much just splitting hairs with the distinctions of the different ways to do these steps. They should be relatively transferrable from city to city.
  5. azzey

    azzey Member

    Sure, however stray too far in the details of footwork, body movement, timing musical interpretation, moves and choreography and you get a different style which is no longer Cuban Salsa/Casino. It is the details that make a style a style, within that there is still a lot of freedom for variation and interpretation but it's knowing which things to change and which to keep the same.
  6. tj

    tj New Member

    I will add that with Cubanos that I've met tend to have a lot more variation and interpretation than most slot style dancers that I know. (Sometimes to the detriment of the connection, however)

    Oddly enough, the reverse is true for Rueda de Casino dancers that I've known.
  7. Sagitta

    Sagitta Well-Known Member

    hmmm... I guess you would find me an oxymoron. ;-)
  8. azzey

    azzey Member

    Maybe they don't advance their variation as they're always going round in circles... ;)
  9. MacMoto

    MacMoto Active Member

  10. devane

    devane New Member

    Well at least I now know 3 versions of the Sombero (single sombrero).:cool:
  11. azzey

    azzey Member

    ..and two ways to spell it. ;)
  12. devane

    devane New Member

    pues sí ....;)
    I make typos in almost every post. A bit lazy for spell-checking.

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