Happy and/or Random Thoughts #3

Discussion in 'Dancers Anonymous' started by samina, Oct 12, 2007.

  1. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    fortunately happy or random thoughts really can't go off topic....though, it is not a bad idea to resurrect whatever bad costume choices threads we happen to have
  2. nikkitta

    nikkitta Well-Known Member

    Then the subject of less-than-fit ladies competing in revealing/unflattering costumes comes up, and heated debates about weight prejudices and who has the right to tell you what to wear, etc. It's a tough one. While I love to see ladies who are confident in their looks and dance abilities regardless of whether they meet the impossible Barbie standard, sometimes you really have to wonder what they (or their Pro) were thinking when they decided to wear that costume.

    Random: DANG it is COLD!
  3. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    right...this is why I currently have a few latin costumes for sale...what I wore 7 years ago is no longer appropriate, for a variety of reasons....I do think it is a good thread for me to go find...as there is a lot to be said about what people care to wear and how much they do or do not solicit candid opinions about that
  4. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Yes. I remember there having been a few very interesting discussions about costuming that could probably do well with another visit. And just FTR, I don't like that solid nude fabric, either. If it's the wrong shade, it looks like you're wearing a giant glass of asafoetida. (Anybody besides me remember that nauseating, cafe au lait wannabe colored home rememdy?) NOT PRETTY.

    When I said nude fabric, I suppose I was assuming nude mesh -- the kind that disappears at a distance. *shrug*


    Random: I think the checkout girl at Target has a crush on DS. And she's not shy. And she's unflappable. And she has her work cut out for her. lol.
  5. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Also random. Februany $5 footlongs at Subway are a thing of the past. Many sandwiches are still $5, but quite a few are up to $6. Honestly, I don't know how Subway franchisees hung in there as long as they did. that's a lot of food for five bucks. How did they ever turn a profit?
  6. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    If it's like what I remember from working for Pizza Hut (a long time ago), there's a huge amount of variation in the cost of making a sandwich, depending on the ingredients. They rely on a statistical analysis to work out the average cost. The cost of some ingredients that used to be very cheap, particularly lettuce, has been going up and that is probably upsetting the projections. Also, I understand that there have been some pretty significant increases in the cost of the syrups for sodas recently, and sodas are generally relied on to be a huge profit item in fast-food pricing.
  7. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Random again. American Movie Classics is airing the movie Ground Hog Day over and over again today. How appropriate.
    mindputtee and cornutt like this.
  8. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member


    That makes sense. :cool: The bad part for franchisees is that they get stuck in the middle. Technically speaking, participation in those promotions is often optional. I wouldn't want to try telling that to customers who saw the commercials and are expecting cheap sandwiches, though. Franchisees pretty much "have to" participate.
  9. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    When I worked for Pizza Hut, the stores in the area I worked in were mostly company-owned, so of course we participated in all promotions. However, franchise stores were never required to participate, and frequently didn't. I know this was a constant source of frustration for the regional management, because of the complaints from customers who would see an ad on TV, go to their local outlet, and then find that that store was a franchisee who was not participating. So it would not surprise me to find out that franchisees are a lot more restricted in that regard these days. And that's tough for them because franchisees are usually not allowed to set their own pricing, and there can be huge variations in the costs of labor and locally-purchased ingredients (e.g., vegetables) from one area to another.
  10. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Yup. And with the constriction in the economy, I've noticed a lot of people buying just the cheap sandwich without adding on the higher profit margin items, like soft drinks.
  11. nikkitta

    nikkitta Well-Known Member

    I don't drink soda now, but back when I did, it pained me to spend $1-$2 on a glass of it versus being able to buy a 2L bottle for that. I always just ask for water in restaurants, usually 2-3 glasses by the time the meal is over.
  12. Lioness

    Lioness Well-Known Member

    It's the same dress I'm looking at making...and I've drawn a tentative design from the back that is really only bare from the bra strap up.
    Cutouts are fine for me...I'm still slim, just a little extra hanging around, and it's highly likely I'm not going to be wearing this until at least April :D
  13. Peaches

    Peaches Well-Known Member

    I'd love to work on those sorts or cost projections and planning. Fun!
  14. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    There is no telling what kind of stuff you can do today. Back in 1979, individual stores and managers couldn't afford computers, so the company headquarters would buy time on a mainframe and feed in sales, inventory, and cost numbers for a region. It really wasn't very sophisticated, although they could sometimes do miracles just with that. Nowdays you could do things like keep track of prep labor and raw ingredient yield, and do that on a per-store basis. We'd probably find that some things that we always though of as high-margin products back in 1979 weren't really.
  15. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    And since I'm on this restaurant thing, and this is the random-thoughts thread, I will offer this: there is no bottled or canned soda that ever beats a soda poured by a properly-set-up fountain system. Whenever I went to a different Hut store in the area (I was a "floater", an employee who works in whatever store is short-handed that night), I'd always check their fountain, and usually wound up making adjustments. The #1 mistake in setting up a fountain: too much syrup in the mix.

    Some background: a real soda fountain, and not just one of those that is connected to what amounts to a big Coke bottle, mixes the drink from two ingredients: syrup and carbonated water. They usually have their own carbonator, which makes carbonated water from the water supply and a cylinder of CO2. When you press on the lever to pour a drink, there are two valves that open, the syrup valve and the carbonated water valve. They mix in the nozzle, which has to be shaped a certain way so that the drink mixes properly.

    There is always an adjustment for how much syrup is in the mix. For some reason, those things always tend to work their way open over time, so that the amount of syrup increases. Store managers would get complaints from customers about the sodas being flat. They'd try to fix it by turning up the CO2 pressure at the carbonator, sometimes to borderline dangerous levels. If I poured a glass of just carbonated water (which you can do by taking the top off of the fountain head and pressing the water valve manually), the carbonation would be fine. Too much syrup kills the carbonation. I'd adjust it and pour them one, and they'd say, "Wow! That tastes great! You must have a ton of syrup in it!" And I'd tell them, "No, I actually turned it down", and they never believed me until I turned it back up and poured another one to show them what difference it made. The sodas tasted better, the customer complaints stopped, and the yield improved because they were going through less syrup. I almost never came across a fountain that was using too little syrup.

    Also, a lot of those guys from the bottler liked to adjust the fountains using those "brix" prism things where you put in some soda, hold it up to the light and measure the little rainbow. I found that those things resulted in a mix with too much syrup. I always adjusted by taste; I'd turn the syrup down until the soda started tasting bitter, then back up just enough to kill the bitterness. I figured if it tasted good and customers liked it, then by definition it was right.
  16. DrDoug

    DrDoug Active Member

    Just so long as it doesn't make your asafoetida look big.
    dancelvr, j_alexandra and pygmalion like this.
  17. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member


    You are so silly! :)
  18. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member


    This is very cool to know. I know that there were two components being mixed on the spot, but I thought it was a simple on/off function for each of the two components. Hmm. :cool:
  19. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member


    That makes a lot of sense. The only problem is that, in order to stay open, businesses have to make profit somewhere. If the store makes no profit, the doors close. Reminds me of the conversation we had many times, in the salsa and swing forums here. A lot of dancers don't drink (much) and a lot of dancers bristled at overpaying for bottled water. Then people came here and complained about the dearth of dance venues. What do you expect? Having a dance club for dancers doesn't pay, but having a clutch and sway club for drinkers does. So dance clubs for dancers disappear. *shrug* (This is the same reason I insist on buying books at Barnes and Noble sometime, instead of always going to the cheapest source, which is usually amazon. I like Barnes and Noble, and they won't stay open if nobody buys anything.)

    I like having two Subway stores within a five minute drive -- one in each direction. So, when I go and buy our usual share-it-for-lunch footlong every Friday, I get the combo. DS and I each get half a sandwich, he gets the chips and I get the drink. Lunch for two for under $8. It works for us. :cool:
  20. Joe

    Joe Well-Known Member

    Perhaps your tongue is just finely calibrated to determine sugar content. ;)
    bordertangoman likes this.

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