Live Green Smoothies

Discussion in 'Dancers Anonymous' started by samina, Nov 29, 2006.

  1. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    yah, don't try to make an LGS with that...unless you're desperate. :)
  2. Sagitta

    Sagitta Well-Known Member

    I actually have used some greens in the past, but usually have cut into smaller pieces before using the hand stick blender. Same for fruit.
  3. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    I'm with sami on this one. Use what you have, but if you have a choice, get at least a standard blender with a smoothie function.

    IME, anything less than that and you end up chewing and chewing and chewing. Unless you want a salad in a glass, the veggies need to be smoothified, IMO. There's nothing wrong with salad in a glass, but I have to be honest and say that I don't have the self discipline to eat one. To me, a big benefit of fruit and veggie smoothies is that they are so easy to drink that you drink your five or ten servings of fruit and veg down in a flash. Once I start having to chew, I really don't see it as any easier/more beneficial than just making a big salad. It's just uglier. :lol:
  4. Sagitta

    Sagitta Well-Known Member

    hmmm...the smoothies with greens were a little gritty though I didn't have to choose...hmm...for me the handstick is convenient as I blend in the container I drink from...hmmmm...maybe I should try the other way and see what difference it makes...
  5. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Sami knows far more about this than I do, but, IMHO, one of the big benefits of live green smoothies is that grinding up the veggies and fruit releases nutrients that your body might not otherwise be able to extract. Of course, eating very finely chopped veggies makes you feel good. Veggies are good for you. But, if they are chopped even finer, or even down to the cellular level, could they be of more benefit? Some people think so. My jury is still out. But ...

    That's kinda what the conversation about the bullet versus the Blendtec versus a kitchen blender is about, IMHO. What's being suggested is that each is able to extract a different amount of stuff from the veggies you're about to consume.

    I remember when a raw/vegan/natural foodie came and gave a talk at my workplace a billion years ago. She said that taking vitamin supplements is basically buying expensive pee. A lot of people found that offensive because vitamin supplements ARE good for you. But her point was that, given the way many of our digestive systems are, we never get a chance to absorb many of the nutrients from supplements, so they basically pass through without ever being absorbed. What if you could change the game so that the nutrients were more easily absorbed?

    It's food for thought, if nothing else.
  6. Larinda McRaven

    Larinda McRaven Site Moderator Staff Member

    I really like Markus and his videos. This is a great thought about buying "superfoods" versus local grown fresh foods. And I DO like my goji berries, I keep a bag of them in my work bag, and I take them as I travel. But I might need to rethink eating them at home where fresh foods are more readily available.
  7. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Is he the raw/vegan dude?

    A really nice benefit of eating local is that produce is fresh and *can be* very cheap. Low transportation costs. That's what I like about Sprouts (a self-proclaimed "farmers' market" that seems more like a produce store/supermarket to me) that is in the West and Southwest, but is growing. They do a very good job of getting locally-grown produce. They also sell organics and other stuff from far away. But they keep their prices low by selling local. It is extremely cheap in the summer months, when lots of local stuff is in season. Love it.
  8. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    Whatever gets more and varied nutrient-dense, minimally denatured grown food into one's diet, so much the better...wherever it comes from. I have lately been quite disapponted in the kind of food that is available locally.

    As for Markus, his vids are always good for a bit of re-inspiration. He's certainly very passionate about his message. And I owe my Chia Chips recipe to one of them.
  9. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Your vicinity got trashed by Mother Nature a couple times this year, IIRC. Drought and drowning. The double whammy. Un-yay. In the spring, things will probably improve. That's my guess, anyway.

    Not a big fan of Sprouts this time of year. But come March/ April and into about September, there's a ton of locally grown, cheap produce. *shrug*
  10. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    Nah, not related to Sandy. I think there are other factors.

    Come spring I may need to consider a CSA and other food sources rather than my local grocery stores, where none are ideal for my tastes. And there is oddly no decent health food store in the area. Very strange.
  11. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    BTW, if you like sprouts, they are easy to do yourself at home year round..
  12. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    I also suspect there are other factors. And yes. I would consider a CSA but, based on my experience here in Texas, I wouldn't wait until spring to start looking. Back in the April time frame this year when I started looking here, the local CSAs were all already booked for the year.
    samina likes this.
  13. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member


    Sprouts, beans, peppers, tomatoes. Easy to grow (organic if you want) indoors all year round. Working on it, sister. :cool:
    samina likes this.
  14. Larinda McRaven

    Larinda McRaven Site Moderator Staff Member

    I falsely assumed that being in the midwest would afford me greater opportunities for local fresh food, but that hasn't been the case. I am glad I had the past two years to transition slowly back there, and am still commuting back and forth for the foreseeable future. That has given me time to do my homework, as well as gently let go of the things I take for granted here.
    samina likes this.
  15. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    Have you done any reading about Permaculture, Larinda? Maybe using permaculture principles would be a way to come by some things out there which might not be available locally. For example, goji berries would grow in the Midwest...
  16. danceronice

    danceronice Well-Known Member

    Where I am, we never have hurricanes or that sort of thing, but gardening was a disaster this year (and it was worse with professional agriculture--the hay crop was especially bad because the dry and wet came at exactly the wrong times.) We had a freak warm period in March, then a massive heat wave and drought in July, then too much rain. Checking in on horticulture/florticulture entry day at the county fair pretty much everyone in line with me had a bad year including whole fields of some crops wiped out, so the local farmers' markets really were lighter. My own garden I had awful luck with squash, despite a bumper crop last year, and the tomatoes took forever and then went from green to half-rotten seemingly overnight. The warm period in March also unfortunately did a number on tree crops-they bloomed too soon. I can grow a few things in the Aerogarden, but most of the outdoor crops just didn't make it. When I'm rich, I'm putting an Edwardian garden room on my house and growing long-season crops indoors.
  17. samina

    samina Well-Known Member

    Check out hugelkulture beds - they would be ideal for the kind if weather challenges you are describing, DoI.
  18. Larinda McRaven

    Larinda McRaven Site Moderator Staff Member

    I am trying to decide between these planting beds or keyhole beds..
  19. Lioness

    Lioness Well-Known Member

    'Tis the season for cheap summer fruits, now, and I own a blender again!

    Today was my first go for a while...I just used what fruit I had in the house, and it wasn't great.
    Apple
    Nectarine
    Cucumber
    Mango
    Spinach

    Plus some protein powder for a post-workout drink.

    I had too many solids in there...barely any room for water, and so it's not a very smooth smoothie.

    I tried freezing some into ice block moulds I got for Christmas...has anyone tried LGS ice blocks before? Do they taste good in frozen form too?

    Next time, watermelon and peach, I think. Might see about adding some nutritious seeds.
  20. Lioness

    Lioness Well-Known Member

    Also, has anyone tried

    • Using green tea as part of the liquid base
    • Putting chunkier things like quinoa and pumpkin seeds in
    • Avocado LGS?
    Wanting to find easy ways to make LGS into something other than a delicious drink...I want something to take to work and fill me up, for example.

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