Master P's shoes

Discussion in 'Dancing on TV' started by Big10, Jan 13, 2006.

  1. Big10

    Big10 Member

    I'm having second thoughts. Okay, like everybody else, I originally thought that he should wear "ballroom" shoes for the DWTS show. But then he seemed sincere when he talked about how they're his "lucky" shoes and he's most comfortable in them. I started thinking some more.....and now I think he should wear whatever shoes he wants, if that's how he best moves. Yes, his dancing sucks, so why not just judge him on his technique and leave it at that?

    As I understand it, the judging is supposed to be purely on dance ability, not clothing or physical appearance. I understand that certain clothing can have the effect of enhancing the appearance of certain movements, but the style of a man's shoe won't really do much for that. And, as long as pivots/spins are not a big part of the choreography, then sneakers won't slow him down in any practical sense -- and they would actually improve his traction if he's scared of falling on the television stage.

    I don't think the "basketball court vs. ballroom floor" comparison raised by Len is truly accurate either. There are practical/safety reasons why someone wouldn't wear hard-soled shoes on a basketball court, which don't come into play for ballroom dancing.

    So, does anybody else share my view?

    (If it makes a difference, I like some ballroom dancing, but I'll confess that I'm turned off by the fake-tan-plastic-smile-overemphasis-on-appearance aspect of it. The constant harping on Master P's shoes seems to be another example of that to me.)
     
  2. alemana

    alemana New Member

    shoes are not an aesthetic choice. they are a functional choice, and the basketball analogy was a very good one.

    of course there is also a 'respect for the rules of the game' argument. that has been put into play in basketball this year as well, where too-long shorts (which have very little functional purpose - they wear them that way to look cool) were banned because they looked too sloppy (or 'ghetto,' arguably.)

    so even in sports, certain clothing choices, even when there are no functional ramifications, are not allowed.
     
  3. alemana

    alemana New Member

    i agree that the focus on the shoes has become somewhat totemic. the producers' choice to focus on that is certainly part and parcel of the general trend to construct a villain.

    but shoes are the #1 tool of the ballroom dancer. they are not an accessory first, or a fashion choice first, they are a tool first. so when somebody refuses to take up that tool, while claiming that he does in fact want to build the house, it rankles a little.
     
  4. Big10

    Big10 Member

    Then what's the "functional" improvement of hard-soled ballroom shoes over sneakers?

    Master P's shoes are much closer to the dance sneakers that many (most?) high-level dancers wear when they are practicing and trying to perfect their moves.
     
  5. alemana

    alemana New Member

    are you asking me (because i'm not sure) how it is that dancing in dancing shoes is better/easier than dancing in sneakers??
     
  6. Another Elizabeth

    Another Elizabeth Active Member

    If I were Ashly (and I were coming back next week), the next thing I would try would be to get him to put suede on the soles of the sneakers.
     
  7. Porfirio Landeros

    Porfirio Landeros New Member

    I wouldn't call ballroom dance shoes hard-soled... actually, they're usually soft enough to feel the floor through them, and allow you to point. When I hear hard-sole, I think of traditional men's dress shoes that have the thick/hard leather bottoms.

    Sneakers are sticky, and when you see high level dancers wearing them, it's probably one of the following: they're Latin dancers, they've been on their feet all day but they want to keep dancing in comfy shoes, or they don't want to focus on standard/smooth footwork.

    I find it virtually impossible to do good heel leads in dance sneakers, but maybe that's just me.
     
  8. africana

    africana New Member

    for some reason this show doesn't hold my interest for long, but big10 i agree with all your arguments re "just let him be", because I caught the part of the show where he explains his motivation for doing the program ("for the kids")
    granted he didn't seem happy to be there but that's good enough lol, let him be

    btw, resoling his lucky shoes seems like a common-sensical idea!
     
  9. Big10

    Big10 Member

    Sort of -- since you made the original declaration about a "functional choice." However, I guess anybody could answer, since I'm genuinely looking for an answer and/or people's opinions.
     
  10. alemana

    alemana New Member

    oh. i think Porfirio explained it well enough.

    i wouldn't salsa in flip flops. i wouldn't ballroom dance in sneakers. i wouldn't pick my nose with a hockey stick. i'm sorry, it's just common sense.
     
  11. alemana

    alemana New Member

    the only thing master p is doing "for the kids," sadly, is acting a little bit like a baby.

    honestly, i don't want to join the pile-on in P because it is, as i mentioned before, unfortunately saddled with Other Issues that rub me the wrong way. i feel for him on the one hand, and on the other, i honestly believe 99% of this crap is brouhaha for the sake of ratings. honestly, i do.
     
  12. Big10

    Big10 Member

    Okay, now I'll play devil's advocate, partly against my own point....hee hee. ;) If he's doing to show to demonstrate a "different" avenue for the kids, then it would seem like a good idea to demonstrate that there's a certain level of conformity to "different" standards that is expected, including a style of dress that they're not used to seeing on their streets. He's the CEO of his own multi-million-dollar rap empire (I think he was one of the top 10 celebrity moneymakers in the world a few years ago), so obviously he can wear whatever shoes he wants in his own office. Not everybody has that luxury at work, though. So, when he's on different turf, he should be an example for kids to "do as the Romans do," in a way that doesn't take away his own personality.

    Anyway, again, all of those things are superficial concerns. If a person thinks he/she dances the best in whatever shoes, then I still don't see a problem with it, just from that standpoint.
     
  13. alemana

    alemana New Member

    definitely agree that if P were tearing up the floor in his lucky-knat shoes, it wouldn't be an issue.
     
  14. DrDoug

    DrDoug Active Member

    I wonder what it would do for the ratings if they got Master P to pick his nose with a hockey stick . . . .
     
  15. waltzgirl

    waltzgirl New Member

    I think the point is that he's likely to dance better (at least a little bit) in dance shoes. In dance shoes, his feet would be more in contact with the floor and more flexible. Dance shoes fit more snugly, so the foot doesn't move inside the shoe. All these things would help him be less clunky. Even dance sneakers are snug and have split soles to aid flexibility. I'm sure there is a dance shoe maker who would be happy to custom make him a pair of shoes that functioned like dance shoes but looked more like he wants to look.

    He keeps saying that his shoes are "P. Miller shoes." Are they his own line? Maybe sticking to them is a marketing ploy on his part.
     
  16. twnkltoz

    twnkltoz Well-Known Member

    Tennis shoes stick. Ballroom shoes are designed to slide, without being too slick. Dance sneakers have soles that slide. Some of his heavy footedness, IMO, would have been solved by proper shoes...particularly important in quickstep.

    And, I think he should show respect for the sport by following the dress code. It's not like it was going to cost him money.
     
  17. dancesportgirl21

    dancesportgirl21 New Member

    Picking one's nose with a hockey stick- that is an interesting image! LOL! I don't think that Master P's "doing it for the kids" is to get ratings, but instead to cover up how scared he looks when he's out there- its all a disguise. Before he danced, when they showed him before commercials he looked nauseous to me. Also, I do think he needs to wear ballroom shoes. As someone else said they are the foundation to any dancer, and him throwing the shoes was completely disrespectful- once again out of fear of change I think. I guess another analogie would be to say would Master P take a rapper seriously if he was in a non- rapper clothing style? No, so like Len said, if he doesn't take himself and his dancing seriously, who else will? Unlike the other dancers who are bringing the hardwork up a few notches, P is showing a definite lack of dedication.
     
  18. Ithink

    Ithink Active Member

    It's not like he'd care if it did cost him money! It's all about being a petulant, stubborn a**hole with him. "I want to do this and this little chick who claims to know what's best for me doesn't know squat" attitude is what he's about. He's disrespectful, rude, obnoxious and dumb as a load of bricks. Doesn't take a genius to repeat the same line about children of Katrina over and over again. It has nothing to do with a suggestion that he conform to the rules of the sport he's participating in and wear its uniform. Does he think 2.5 inch heels are comfortable and lucky for all the ladies to dance in?

    If he was doing it to show people in the ghetto that someone can make something out of himself if they try hard enough and work at it, well then he's dumber than I think because with his behavior he's doing just the opposite - he's showing them that being a dimwitted prick is all he's capable of so what hope do they have?!

    I know he won't be gone tonight but man, how I wish he was!!
     
  19. mamboqueen

    mamboqueen Well-Known Member

    Wow, tell us what you really think, Ithink! *LOL*

    (you're right, btw)
     
  20. gusmahler

    gusmahler New Member

    They are his own line. See, e.g., http://www.shopping.com/xPO-P_Miller_J4_5_Basketball_Shoe_Mens

    Surprised me because I thought Jay Z and 50 Cent were the only rappers with their own line of shoes (Reebok S. Carter and Reebok G Unit, respectively).
     

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