Shoe Straps

Discussion in 'Ballroom Dance' started by AquaDancer, Sep 7, 2003.

  1. AquaDancer

    AquaDancer New Member

    I recently purchased the Capezio X-Strap ballroom shoe. The strap is too long so I'm wondering if I can just snip it to the right size? :roll: Do I need to do anything to the strap after I cut it?

    Any suggestions are appreciated.
     
  2. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Where did you go?

    When I bought shoes with long straps, the women who fitted them just snipped them off for me, with no more attention required. Try giving a call to your shoe dealer, and see if they'll cut off the straps for you. Mine did.

    Jenn
     
  3. AquaDancer

    AquaDancer New Member

    Thanks Jenn, but unfortunatelly I got these mail order. I'm just concerned that I might mess them up.
     
  4. MissAlyssa

    MissAlyssa New Member

    cut them at an angle so that they don't fray. I always use a bit of clear nail polish on the ends just to make sure. then just poke extra buckle holes if you need them. :D
     
  5. AquaDancer

    AquaDancer New Member

    Thanks a bunch MissAlyssa :D
     
  6. MissAlyssa

    MissAlyssa New Member

    no problem aqua. welcome to the forums, I'm glad you posted! :D
     
  7. Pacion

    Pacion New Member

    Didn't quite know which shoe thread to put this in, searched and decided this was probably the best one. :lol:

    In Strictly Dance Fever, the dance competition that is currently going on in the UK, three couples had to learn the Foxtrot. I noticed that their shoes were court shoes with a strap going from the top inside of the shoe, to the outside back. This no doubt makes the shoe a lot more stable on the foot and the lady can dance without worrying about losing her shoe.

    I think this is a design that may have only come about in the last year or so? Why did it take so long?

    As anyone (ladies I mean :wink: ) danced with this style? How do you feel in them versus the slip on court shoes? Does it make it easier to focus on the dancing and not that you might lose your shoe (even though the shoe is probably very snug in the first place), or am I imagining things?
     
  8. Laura

    Laura New Member

    Do you mean the ones with the diagonal strap across the instep, or something else?

    If you mean the diagonal strap ones, they've been around for a while and International makes them. If you mean something else, can you draw us a picture or find one on the web?
     
  9. ShyDancer

    ShyDancer New Member

    Supadance have them too.

    I own a pair and love them, i dont think I will ever go back to the ones without the straps..I still have a few old pairs here that I wear for practice occasionally, but mostly its my strap ones.

    I dont know if it actually gives you more stability..but i do feel more comfortable knowing that the back of my shoes wont slip off when Im on my toes, it gives me a sense of stability and I feel a lot more confident putting more power into my steps.
     
  10. randomMysh

    randomMysh New Member

    I noticed a lot of women dancing with a clear wide rubber band around the shoe and the instep. I think it's for the same purpose and I think they sell those in dance shoe stores.
     
  11. Laura

    Laura New Member

    Yes, but the clear straps are considered by some to be a bit declasse', so to speak.

    I used to wear the diagonal strap shoes that International sells. They were very pretty and I loved the way they looked and the fact they always stayed on, but they didn't fit my feet very well. I've since switched to a style of shoe that fits my foot and has elastic sewn inside the entire foot opening. These stay on great, don't hurt my feet, and are just right for me.
     
  12. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo New Member

    I do this too! Funny, some people just don't have a clue. The Japanese salseras over here with their tiny ankles have these 6" lengths of extra strap blowin' in the breeze, well it looks pretty silly... :?
     
  13. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    Maybe they're afraid to cut them because they don't know the cut-at-an-angle trick. :? :?:
     
  14. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo New Member

    I actually cut mine straight across- they are not satin but leather, so they won't fray anyway. Maybe some people feel they would damage their shoes by doing this procedure.(shrug)
     
  15. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    I can't imagine why they don't ask the folks at the shoe shop. The first time I got strappy dance shoes, the lady who sold them offered and cut them for me on the spot. *shrug*
     
  16. mamboqueen

    mamboqueen Well-Known Member

    My biggest shoe pet-peeve! Cut the suckers!

    Okay; what do you use to poke extra holes?? I'm in need of this on a pair I have.
     
  17. and123

    and123 Well-Known Member

    I use a really big, sharp needle (used for embroidery and/or sewing with yarn). The pros probably use an awl. I then use the tips of my sewing/manicure/embroidery scissors and wiggle them around in the hole to widen it a bit if necessary. Generally forcing the buckle through the hole does the trick too, but it's much more blunt and harder to push through. Afterwards, I use some fray-check on the hole to reinforce it. It sucks to tear a buckle hole. At that point, the only reliable solution is to replace the entire strap (though I did have a pair of latin shoes that I swear were held together with glue and layer upon layer of fabric paint. Just couldn't give them up).

    Melissa
     
  18. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo New Member

    Most of the ladies I know have purchased them from their dance teachers, who order them from large distributors far away in Tokyo.
     
  19. MacMoto

    MacMoto Active Member

    Do you mean like this?
    [​IMG]
    This is by International, presumably the one Laura's talking about.
     
  20. Swingolder

    Swingolder New Member

    MacMoto, that sure is a beautiful shoe!

    I just snipped off my long straps when I first got my new shoes. I DON'T have tiny ankles but still had a lot of extra.
     

Share This Page