Soaring gas prices

Discussion in 'Dancers Anonymous' started by lynn, Aug 9, 2005.

  1. Joe

    Joe Well-Known Member

    Not very observant, are you? :p

    Do you need premium, or something?
  2. DancingMommy

    DancingMommy Active Member

    Gas is hovering around $2.20 here in O-town.... Why would it be cheaper here? Tourists?
  3. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    State taxes? I don't know. Because when I moved here from Orlando seven months ago, prices here were about 15 cents a gallon, on average, cheaper than they were in Orlando. So something changed. Don't know what. *shrug*
  4. lynn

    lynn New Member

    I remember some told me the reason why gas prices are so high in Canada is because of all the tax (federal tax, provincial tax, environmental tax, surplus tax...etc)... I have yet to find the break down of the components of the fuel price we pay.....definately something worth checking into.
  5. pygmalion

    pygmalion Well-Known Member

    The state of Florida had a state gas tax break of 10 cents (IIRC) per gallon for a month last summer. It really made a difference.

    I think transportation is a factor, as well, though. For example, during last year's hideous hurricane season, gas prices in Florida fluctuated quite a bit. The Florida peninsula is a major hub for the transportation of gasoline in the southeastern US, and, with all the storms, the tankers couldn't get into port, when they needed to. :? So demand was high and supply was unpredictable.
  6. kansas49er

    kansas49er New Member

    From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gasoline_tax


    Canada
    The tax on fuel in Canada can vary greatly between provinces. On average, 40 to 50% of the total price of gas at the pump is tax. The federal government receives its share through the excise tax (10 ¢/L) and the Goods and Services Tax (7%). Most of the variation comes from the provincial tax. The lowest being the Yukon with 6.2% and the highest being Newfoundland and Labrador with 16.5%. In addition to this there is sometime provincial sales tax, such as in Quebec, and in larger urban centers there is a transit tax.

    Taxes collected from the federal government (totaling $10,000,000,000 a year) do not get reserved for any specific program. However, provincial taxes usually go to fund road repair and construction

    United States of America
    The first U.S. state tax was introduced in February 1919 in Oregon. It was a 1 cent per U.S. gallon (0.3 ¢/L) tax. In the following decade, all 48 US States (and Washington, DC) introduced a gasoline tax, and by 1939 an average tax of 3.8¢ per U.S. gallon (1 ¢/L) of fuel was levied by the individual states.

    While state fuel taxes had been around for more than a decade, the first federal gasoline tax in the United States was created on June 6, 1932 with the enactment of the Revenue Act of 1932 with a tax of 1 cent per U.S. gallon (0.3 ¢/L). The U.S. federal gasoline tax as of 2005 was 18.4 cents per U.S. gallon (4.86 ¢/L), and the gasoline taxes in the various states range from 10 cents to 33 cents, averaging about 22 cents per U.S. gallon (5.8 ¢/L). Unlike most goods in the US, the price displayed includes all taxes, rather than being calculated at the point of purchase.

    From
    http://www.kcgasprices.com/tax_info.aspx

    For various us state fuel taxes (does not include city or county)

    For Kansas (where I live) it is 25 cents. Therefore, the total tax I pay is 43. 4 cents.

    UGGH!
  7. lynn

    lynn New Member

    :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:

    Ouch!! Now I really feel like packing my bag and move somewhere...
  8. Laura

    Laura New Member

    In 2001 I bought a Honda Insight. That's one of the cars with the gas/electric hybrid power system. I get about 40 miles per gallon in the city (my city is very hilly), and 60 miles per gallon on the freeway. I buy gas so infrequently that it's a bit of a suprise every time I go to fill up. I really only buy gas about once or twice per month these days.

    I originally wanted the Insight because it was the lowest-emissions production car on the market, and because I thought the idea of saving a little gas would be kind of cool. Also, I like it because it's tiny and I live in an area where parking is tough. I'm able to park in tiny spaces that bigger cars have to pass up. In hindsight getting the Insight was a really smart decision. The car has been a gem, it's easy to park, and the maintenance costs aren't any better or worse than any other Honda.
  9. Katarzyna

    Katarzyna Well-Known Member

    I'm so happy I don't drive....
  10. lynn

    lynn New Member

    lucky you!! The transit system is quite unreliable where I live.....can't really get around without a car.....
  11. Sagitta

    Sagitta Well-Known Member

    Yup. That hurts. :(
  12. Laura

    Laura New Member

    I think that if they put the instantaneous mileage readouts in regular cars like they have in the hybrids, people would start saving a lot of gasoline! You can tell right away what your driving style does to your gas mileage. It made me change my habits: I pretty much coast the last block to a stop sign, and accelerate slowly from stops, and other such things. If everyone had this information, I bet a lot of people would change too. As my husband says, having the instant readouts there turns driving economically into a sort of video game!
  13. Katarzyna

    Katarzyna Well-Known Member

    Would be good to lean though... just not now
  14. Laura

    Laura New Member

    Because in the metro New York area a lot of the good tech jobs are in the suburbs, but if you like cities then it's a heck of a lot more fun to live and dance in the city! I used to do the same thing when I lived out there.
  15. lynn

    lynn New Member

    I think the problem with hybrid is that they're much more expensive than the regular small cars (ie, prius vs. echo - not sure about the price of prius, have to check it out). I think the upfront investment scares away a lot of ppl.
  16. Laura

    Laura New Member

    I heard a radio report last night saying that the cost of housing is rising in smaller cities, such as Tulsa. I wonder if that is an indication of people returning to the minor cities?
  17. lynn

    lynn New Member

    Sometimes the living expenses in the city are too high for those who are not earning top dollars. The only alternative is to go back to the minor cities....
  18. Katarzyna

    Katarzyna Well-Known Member

    NY is expensive housing wise, but you can find many cheaper options in Brooklyn or Queens
  19. Laura

    Laura New Member

    As their popularity grows I think the prices will start to come down as part of "economies of scale." At first Honda was only going to make three years' worth of Insights as an experiment to prove they could put a mass-produced hybrid car into the market and that it would run fine under consumer conditions. They still have it in production -- the demand is high so they keep doing more every year.

    The year I got mine they had planned to sell only 5,000 in the US. They sold out, and more and more people want them. As the market shows more and more consistent demand, and production goes up, and more hybrid models are introduced, the prices will eventually change.

    But the big thing is that the existence of the Prius, Highlander, and Civic, and Insight in the market now show that hybrid technology is viable. And anyone who can afford one of those damn Hummers can buy a hybrid. Heck, my Insight cost less than my husband's normal garden-variety Jeep.

    New technologies are always more expensive at first. Remember when portable CD players first turned up? I bought my first Sony Diskman in 1988 for $316. Fifteen years later you can buy one for way less than $100.
  20. lynn

    lynn New Member

    That's true, but it takes a while for people to be familiar with the new technology and then another few years for there to be enough demand for the price to come down. I remember waiting for years before buying my LCD monitor. I"m not sure about cars though, hopefully the unexpected high demand will drive down prices earlier than later....

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