Social Dancing: Why So Critical?

Discussion in 'Ballroom Dance' started by MintyMe, Apr 1, 2014.

  1. IndyLady

    IndyLady Active Member

    This is a great suggestion... I have been dancing for several years (and hence have done thousands of crossovers), but I will definitely miss the crossover lead whenever the gentleman turns his body but leaves his arm in the same place. If, as fascination says, the elbow (and therefore the hand) stays fixed relative to the core, as a lady, I have no choice but to do the right thing. Wait, that's a different thread.
    Sania likes this.
  2. Loki

    Loki Well-Known Member

    Yes, a casual acquaintance is an older lady from Omsk in Siberia and I can count on her to let me know if I've gained or lost weight. She's very nice but can be blunt by some standards. LOL!
  3. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    yep....first thing my grandmother would do when I walked in the door was to assess my degree of fatness....probably a large part of my issues
  4. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    rod; not pyschic.....but spent a bunch of dough and done a bunch of dancing
  5. danceronice

    danceronice Well-Known Member

    I've never had that many I need to remember. I can think of maybe two and I live halfway across the country now anyway.
  6. Loki

    Loki Well-Known Member

    Bad juju - one will show up now at your venue because you mentioned them.
  7. danceronice

    danceronice Well-Known Member

    Eh. I'm never there for socials anyway. I work nights.
  8. Lizz

    Lizz New Member

    Yess this happened to me before plenty of times by one gentleman in particular. And because i never refuse a dance, whenever we danced it i would just ignore his comments. Funny thing is, i didn't find his lead all that awesome, and as i got better he had the nerve to ask me to be his partner! *sucks teeth* Man Listen!
  9. twnkltoz

    twnkltoz Well-Known Member

    Welcome to the forum Lizz!
  10. Lizz

    Lizz New Member

    Hey Twnkltoz!!
    thanks for the welcome!!!!
    twnkltoz likes this.
  11. tangomaniac

    tangomaniac Active Member

    From the Argentine Tango forum: Single men and women sit on opposite sides of the dance floor. The Argentines use cabeceo (eye glance) to attract the attention of whom they want to dance. If the couples' eyes meet, the man has a split second to point his head towards the dance floor and the woman has a split second to nod "yes" or look away. Both can then look for somebody else to dance if the woman declines. The glances are private so nobody knows if there was an invitation and declination. In ballroom, the man has to walk up to the woman, invade her personal space and ask her dance. A woman can feel intimidated to dance with somebody she doesn't want.
    dancelvr likes this.
  12. Hedwaite

    Hedwaite Well-Known Member

    It becomes acceptable to refuse when I say it does, speaking only for myself, and that's all a "gentleman" needs. Kind of like other things guys ask women to do: No means no. It's not my problem if you can't compute that. If you try to make it my problem, then the other 99 problems you have might seem like a trip to a candy store- or Whole Foods or whatever.

    Also note, the original excerpt was written in 1893. There were many other lunacies that were acceptable by a society from which we've hopefully evolved. Sometimes the past is best left for LARPing and bad self-published romantic fiction.

    I like the AT pre-dance-dance. It saves face, is polite and minimal impact. How many of you do The Eyeball Thing, though, when someone you don't like is Coming For You across the floor to the other guys at the table, that silent plea of "please- I don't care what this is, just dance with me NOW before he does!" desperation? Sometimes a foot-nudge, or a flatout interruption "That's great- hey, so sure, I'd LOVE to dance with you rightnowGET UP NOW OR NEVAR RISE AGAIN..."
    atk likes this.
  13. tangomaniac

    tangomaniac Active Member

    It's difficult to do in the US because the lights are turned down very low. In Buenos Aires, the lights are ON so everybody can see who is there and be seen. Here's an example:


    I almost forgot. In Argentine Tango, dancers are expected to dance a set of FOUR. It's NOT one and out, unless your partner is so terrible you just don't want to continue.
  14. Hedwaite

    Hedwaite Well-Known Member

    Hope they're not extended remixes! :-D
    IndyLady and ajiboyet like this.
  15. bowi

    bowi New Member

    I've been dancing for about 9 months now and I think it can be quite helpful to receive some advice during the dances at my club. It does depend how the advice is given though. Most of people that give me advice are people I dance with more often and are more experienced than me.
    Bailamosdance likes this.
  16. tangomaniac

    tangomaniac Active Member

    I only give advice if asked. Dancing and giving advice ("teaching") are two different skills.
  17. Angel HI

    Angel HI Well-Known Member

    More importantly, teaching, showing, giving advice, and sharing opinion are 4 very different things, not all of wihch require skill. One should simply refrain from either while 'dancing'.
    IndyLady likes this.
  18. bowi

    bowi New Member

    The most common advice I get is to stand up straight. My teacher has told me this plenty of times too, but it's good to be reminded of it sometimes when I start "bending over" again. I don't get very technical advice from dance partners, except when dancing with my teacher.
  19. Angel HI

    Angel HI Well-Known Member

    Welcome to the DF.
    bowi likes this.
  20. twnkltoz

    twnkltoz Well-Known Member

    The problem is, just because someone goes out dancing every Saturday night doesn't mean they know what they're talking about. Sure, "stand up straight" is good advice, but "you're doing this dance wrong" may not be. Take dance floor advice with a grain of salt.

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