Studio non-fraternization contracts, protecting whom?

Discussion in 'General Dance Discussion' started by Gator, Aug 24, 2003.

  1. danceronice

    danceronice Well-Known Member

    Well, not to give the game away, but most liability releases are basically worthless if the injured party has a good lawyer (and of course are totally invalid if there's GROSS negligence as you can't sign away that liability).

    And really, the insurance issue where kids are concerned makes me think the smart thing is not to teach children. The amount of background checks and paranoia involved with them now really is more trouble than it's worth in most cases.

    Personally, I like the policy "We're all adults here." Nine out of ten instructors aren't dumb enough to risk income loss on poor decisions. The ones that are tend to go out of business.
  2. TangoRocks

    TangoRocks Member

    Let me chime in as another fan of suburbakngth's approach. I would have loved to have that kind of dance relationship with the instructors at my studio, but in my experience, except once or twice at a salsa club, I have never seen any of our instructors at a dance event in this city. Conversely, I have seen and danced with multiple instructors from other studios in the selfsame venues, so it's either a franchise restriction or the interpretation of a franchise guideline by our current franchisee, who is pretty strict when it comes to the non-frat policy.

    As an aside, the favoritism/jealousy dilemma can happen even without dancing outside the studio--I'm not proud of it but I had been jealous of some people who spent a lot of time (=money) on private classes and how I perceived them to be "favoured" not just by their teacher but by the rest of the studio staff. It is possible it was just a perception issue on my part (and this was back when I was just starting dancing with all the insecurities that entailed) but the risk is always there that the more time you spend with someone in ANY capacity (student/teacher, customer, client, service provider, poker buddy etc.) from the outside it could be interpreted as favouritism.
  3. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    and I would concur that while it may look like favoritism...it often isn't...often it is just about tending to an investment
  4. suburbaknght

    suburbaknght Well-Known Member

    Wow, thanks for the kind words everyone.

    This was actually a policy I developed while at a franchise. I sat down with my studio owner and we worked out what was prohibited by the letter of the franchise policy, what the policy was intended to protect against, what her equivalent experiences had been, and how we could make it a positive experience for the students and the staff. I think it was worthwhile, both for the students and for me.
  5. Terpsichorean Clod

    Terpsichorean Clod Moderator

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