What makes a dance studio MORE attractive?

Discussion in 'Ballroom Dance' started by Dr Dance, Dec 25, 2013.

  1. Born2Ball

    Born2Ball New Member

    Here are the ones I can think of right now based on what I wish my studio would improve on-

    -take amex (though taking cc's would be a must)
    -stop covering the mirrors with decorations
    -offer more advanced group classes and stick to what is on the group schedule
    -don't interrupt my lesson with questions about showcases, entries, comps or to introduce me to people
    -also, make sure I get my full 45 minutes--don't show up late or cut my lesson early for a smoke break or to talk about entries etc
    -get current with technology! I would love to schedule my lessons online, check my schedule online, see the group classes online (other than a picture of the printed calendar) and see a history of my lessons/classes etc. If PureBarre can do it, I would hope my studio could figure it out with what I'm paying them.
    -on that note, use social media! if the group class changes, the teacher for group changes, there is news of some sort, tweet/facebook it! have some sort of online presence so I can track these things!
    -lastly, have parties at least once a month so that we can meet/interact with other students (some we may never see otherwise) and also practice showcases and social dancing. consider this a reward and thank you to the students who pay so much to your studio!
    IndyLady and DesireeDC like this.
  2. dncergrl

    dncergrl Active Member

    I am doing pro-am and the studio is large, Lately I have noticed people "practicing" who are obviously listening to my lessons and yesterday they shamelessly started practising what I was working on. I am starting to feel like they are piggy backing on my dollar. If it becomes a regular thing, I think I will talk to my pro about.
  3. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    it is the business of your pro...I wouldn't mention it unless your pro is bothered by it...you'd pay either way...he's the one getting cheated....it is also possible that, if they take lessons from him, they are simply reminded by what you are doing and figure they need to practice it as well
    flightco likes this.
  4. ajiboyet

    ajiboyet Well-Known Member

    Er...I don't quite get the "he's the one getting cheated" part...
  5. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    he is the one who should be getting paid for what they are learning...they should have to book him to get that info...his student has to pay either way
  6. Dancing Irishman

    Dancing Irishman Well-Known Member

    It's not like they'd pay her to teach them the stuff, so she's still getting the same knowledge per dollar spent. He, on the other hand, might end up selling one or two fewer lessons because of the "freeloaders".

    Only way it's her problem is if she finds them distracting, but even then, telling people they can't practice near a lesson that's going on is at best ambiguous for a studio policy.
    fascination likes this.
  7. raindance

    raindance Active Member

    One teacher I worked with took that attitude that the more times his/her students heard the same thing, the better (they might get better faster), so your teacher may not mind. (Not that s/he actively encouraged such things, mind you, but when you teach in an open space it is pretty hard not to have some things get overheard by whoever else in in the room.) I can see how it could be distracting, however.
  8. Bailamosdance

    Bailamosdance Well-Known Member

    I think the teacher should be happy. These other students will, if the teaching is applicable to their dancing, then be interested in talking lessons from this teacher. Very quickly,the subject the lesson will change and then not be relevant to the outside student, so I would not worry. If anything, this gives the teacher an opportunity to sell his services.
  9. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    right...that is my point...if the pro doesn't mind...let it go...thhey are either marketing, or don't care
  10. sbrnsmith

    sbrnsmith Active Member

    Not only interrupting lessons, but what about those people who keep talking to the pro after their lesson, cutting into his break and MY lesson time....pet peeve
  11. debmc

    debmc Well-Known Member

    Yes..that is why I think back to back 45 mins scheduled lessons are not a good idea...because pros do need some time between lessons for this sort of thing.
  12. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    I'm always amazed by how studios spend a lot of money to put up large mirrors, and then they wind up covered with crap and blocked by furniture. We're not immune; we did a big clean-off a couple of months ago. The big thing was the music stand and equipment, which had started out in one corner and gradually grew across the room so it was blocking half of one of the big mirrors. We moved it all to the other end of the room, and it was like we found another mirror!
    IndyLady likes this.
  13. cornutt

    cornutt Well-Known Member

    Also, I'm surprised poles haven't been mentioned...
  14. Born2Ball

    Born2Ball New Member

    Thanks so much! That one is a huge pet peeve of mine and I'm about to finally say something at my studio! I pay a boatload for my lessons and do not think that time should be spent introducing me to people or asking me what time I want my lessons the next week, if I want more stones on a dress, will I be doing X comp etc. Come on…I spend enough time at the studio that they can ask me these questions another time!!
  15. Born2Ball

    Born2Ball New Member

    I'd try and look at it differently, almost as a compliment. I will sometimes watch other lessons/students and "piggyback" on their lessons, so to say. For me, sometimes it just makes more sense when you hear it from someone else or see someone else do it. I'm also a very visual person so sometimes just watching someone else do something can help it click with me or help me see another way to improve my own technique. Of course, I also dance at a franchise studio and we have a "family" atmosphere so that may be somewhat of the difference (I could be wrong). Either way, I wouldn't look at it as a negative at all.
    jump'n'jive likes this.
  16. Born2Ball

    Born2Ball New Member

    On this note, I hate how lessons are booked back to back without a break! At our studio they are 45 minute lessons, but I quickly learned that they are treated like 40 minute lessons with the last 5 minutes used for filling out our lesson book or (most often) smoke breaks/chit chat. But there are so many times where instructors show up 5 minutes late (due to a previous lesson running over, their smoke break, life etc) and then we end early…come on! I'm not paying for an advertised 45 minute lesson and only receiving 35! In my opinion lessons should be scheduled every hour but take 50 minutes. The last 10 minutes should be used for discussion/recaps, filling out the book, payment, smoke breaks (if there is time as this is not the priority etc). I was a competitive softball pitcher my entire life and coached for several years and this is how we did our lessons--it worked much more smoothly and I felt the last 10 minutes were incredibly important---you need that time to reflect on what was learned in the lesson. Ok, now I'm just ranting...
    Miss Silly likes this.
  17. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    well...introducing you to others is one thing...talking with you about issues pertaining to your own future lessons and caomps, are appropriated on lesson time.....you can keep it to a minimum byt waiting to answer til you know what your answer is so that it can be brief...both those are not inapporpriate questions
    Dancing Irishman and IndyLady like this.
  18. fascination

    fascination Site Moderator Staff Member

    now THIS is a problem
  19. Bailamosdance

    Bailamosdance Well-Known Member

    Honestly, unless your choreography is so special that nobody else in the world has it, you have to come to the realization that in coaching lessons, everyone works on the same things. Even at the highest level, everyone is working on technique and quality. And in syllabus, details are all the same. And, get over the fact that others are looking at YOU. They may be looking at the result of the coaching, but unless they are really much lower level than you I would assume they were checking out what you were being taught, not what you are expressing...
  20. Dancing Irishman

    Dancing Irishman Well-Known Member

    Couldn't have said it better myself. Comp discussions are definitely something to minimize, but why should an instructor need to contact you during their personal (non-teaching) time when it's usually a quick question at the end of a lesson?

    As far as cutting lessons short goes, I can totally see how it would be frustrating, but my current coach runs his scheduling a bit like a spaniard, so I can't say I have any recent experience with it.

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