Alternative AT music

#86
I'd love to see a video of any of your milongas during an alternative tanda.. I personally haven't a clue how to dance in a social context to a lot of the music proposed in this thread..
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#87
Same steps, different feeling. In a way, it's no different than being able to dance tango, milonga, and vals. Same steps, different feeling. Move when you feel compelled to move. Make your steps and your body a 3-D representation if the music.

...it's just being moved by, and moving to, different music. Same steps, different feeling.
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
#92
I'll definitely have a listen. I started with a few pieces of music last night and I have to say it's a bit mind bending. It's like looking at tango music through a completely different sets of lenses. I think I'll going to google for some videos of tango nuevo as well. Some of these pieces make it easy for me to visualize tango. Others are more difficult. I'm going to look for some videos. :)

This is awesome. Thanks, uys and gals. :)
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
#93
I probably should add that this thread got me to thinking about what makes tango music tango music. Meaning, a lot of the things I've listened to in this thread are far, far removed from any of the stereotypical *ahem* traditional tango music. There's no recognizable tango rhythm. A lot of it has a contemporary feel. Everything so far has the "right" time signature (although I wouldn't be surprised if some flaunt that rule, as well.)

So what makes it tango? What's to stop me from picking ... I dunno ... a Michael Jackson pop tune or a Dolly Parton country love song and calling it tango?

Not seeking to challenge anyone. Just really want to know. Yes. I know the answer's probably at least partly subjective. That's okay.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#94
I don't know that there is anything that makes it tango music. I mean, by virtue of the fact that it's "alternative" tango music, we're already saying that it really isn't. But if it speaks to you, and you have a dance vocabulary that allows you to interpret it and dance to it, then it works. Tango is (extremely debatably) somewhat unique in that the (lack of) structure of the dance facilitates that sort of interpretation. WCS is, IMO, very similar in that regard. So it isn't so much that it's tango music, in that there is a defining characteristic, but instead is tango-able music.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#96
I probably should add that this thread got me to thinking about what makes tango music tango music. Meaning, a lot of the things I've listened to in this thread are far, far removed from any of the stereotypical *ahem* traditional tango music. There's no recognizable tango rhythm. A lot of it has a contemporary feel. Everything so far has the "right" time signature (although I wouldn't be surprised if some flaunt that rule, as well.)

So what makes it tango? What's to stop me from picking ... I dunno ... a Michael Jackson pop tune or a Dolly Parton country love song and calling it tango?

Not seeking to challenge anyone. Just really want to know. Yes. I know the answer's probably at least partly subjective. That's okay.

my take is they fall into several different camps;
heavily rythmic so they can work as alt. milonga

very slow; like Piazzolla's Oblivion, any dancer who gets the feel of moving slowly and fluidly

ones with interesting melodic structure eg knockin' by Carolina Chocolate Drops

steady rhythmic; pretty much antithetical to tango music, but works like jazz: that its up to you to work across the groove.
 

Dance Ads