Ballroom Sponsorship

Ithink

Active Member
#21
How does the level of the couple figure into it? And when they have to help sell them, what kinds of things do they do to make the sale?
 

wyllo

New Member
#22
I've always wondered how many people are actually sponsored? I would think all the pro finalists have deals, but is this a safe assumption and how far down the line does it go? Are amateur and pro-am dancers able to get sponsors when they reach a certain level?
 

Katarzyna

Well-Known Member
#23
Well, the better dancers the better the gown will look on the floor so the better promotion. Better couples tend to compete more and more prestigious events, therefore visibility...

Some designers ask for them to act as sales reps wherever they are located..
 

Katarzyna

Well-Known Member
#24
wyllo said:
I've always wondered how many people are actually sponsored? I would think all the pro finalists have deals, but is this a safe assumption and how far down the line does it go? Are amateur and pro-am dancers able to get sponsors when they reach a certain level?
QUite a bit of pro am is sponsored because that's where the money is..

I think quite a bit of people are sponsored... Most of the pro semi and up I will assume are... a lot of higher level ams are.. and a lot of pro am...
 

Laura

New Member
#25
wyllo said:
Are amateur and pro-am dancers able to get sponsors when they reach a certain level?
Sure. A friend of mine got sponsored when she was doing Pro/Am. Granted, she was one of the top Pro/Am ladies in the country and she was dancing with one of the top pros in her style in the country, so they had a lot of visibility.

I've sponsored a couple different amateurs in the past, mostly because I really liked them as people and as dancers and wanted to help them pursue their dancing dreams.
 

wyllo

New Member
#26
Laura said:
I've sponsored a couple different amateurs in the past, mostly because I really liked them as people and as dancers and wanted to help them pursue their dancing dreams.
That's so sweet of you! (but really not at all surprising). :)
 
#28
Laura said:
I've sponsored a couple different amateurs in the past, mostly because I really liked them as people and as dancers and wanted to help them pursue their dancing dreams.

It's good to know there's folks like you out there. I had often wondered how the top people could afford to dress themselves for comps...how many different dresses one needs to have and how frequent the turnover. Of course one can resell, but still...

BTW, I've been wondering who the designers were for DWTS and what the prices and such were. I would be interested to know.
 

Katarzyna

Well-Known Member
#29
caityrosey said:
BTW, I've been wondering who the designers were for DWTS and what the prices and such were. I would be interested to know.
Designs to shine, I think standard dresses start ar $4,500... latin a bit less...
 
#31
Katarzyna said:
Designs to shine, I think standard dresses start ar $4,500... latin a bit less...
Which is why its nice to buy gowns from a sponsored person. We've bought sponsored dresses on four occasions. Each one was in excellent shape and the price ranged from $1000 to $1900. Two of the dresses were sold again at close to what was paid. I'm trying to sell the other two.
 

Laura

New Member
#33
caityrosey said:
It's good to know there's folks like you out there. I had often wondered how the top people could afford to dress themselves for comps...how many different dresses one needs to have and how frequent the turnover. Of course one can resell, but still...

BTW, I've been wondering who the designers were for DWTS and what the prices and such were. I would be interested to know.
I wasn't sponsporing top-level people. Personally, I'm tired of seeing all the goodies go to the people at the top. So, I worked with a couple of local dancers who were just great people with a love of dancing and an easy-to-work with attitude. Both were students, and were dancing Championship level in their respective styles, but they weren't household names in the dance world or anything.

Maria McGill/Designs to Shine did the dresses for Dancing with the Stars. She's got a web site you can take a look at.
 
#34
Laura,
since you've been involved with sponsoring, I have a few questions thatI am very curious about:

how did you pick the couples that you sponsored:
did they approach you? did you approach them?
were you already friends with the couples before you started sponsoring them?
has anyone else ask you who you refused?
did the sponsored dresses sell later?
who came up with designs, you or the dancers?
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#35
Laura said:
Sure. A friend of mine got sponsored when she was doing Pro/Am. Granted, she was one of the top Pro/Am ladies in the country and she was dancing with one of the top pros in her style in the country, so they had a lot of visibility.

I've sponsored a couple different amateurs in the past, mostly because I really liked them as people and as dancers and wanted to help them pursue their dancing dreams.
so laura (my new best friend) how bout lunch?;) (kidding, kidding, just could't resist:D )
 
#36
Wow, to be sponsored would be a dream come true! I thought Amateurs couldn't be sponsored though? I must be confused ... anybody able to clarify? Would greatly appreciate it ... :)
 
#37
Standard Dancer said:
Wow, to be sponsored would be a dream come true! I thought Amateurs couldn't be sponsored though? I must be confused ... anybody able to clarify? Would greatly appreciate it ... :)
as long as they are not paying you but are just giving you dresses shoes and other dance supplies - just helping to cover training and competition costs - it is allowed.

Eugene and Maria in latin are definitely sponsored (at least for shoes) - Eugene's picture is on boxes of capezio man's shoes.
Craig and Katya are sponsored.
Lucas and Karolina got sponsored very shortly before thay turned pro I think.
Other couples might be sponsored as well...

I even know of one girl dancing prechamp latin that got sponsored dresses
 

Laura

New Member
#39
Kitty said:
how did you pick the couples that you sponsored:
did they approach you? did you approach them?
In both cases they approached me to make them a dress (at my usual rates), but because I liked them so much I offered to sponsor them. I knew these were people who could really use a bit of help, and would really appreciate it.

were you already friends with the couples before you started sponsoring them?
Yes.

has anyone else ask you who you refused?
No one else has asked.

did the sponsored dresses sell later?
Yes, except for one, but that was also the first dress I ever made for someone else so it wasn't that fabulous to begin with.

who came up with designs, you or the dancers?
I like it when the dancer has a good idea of what she wants, but isn't actually picky about how things come out. I used to love working with one of the people I'd sponsor -- she'd say something like "I need it to be very simple, and black, and have long sleeves" and I'd take it from there. She was great because she'd stone her own dresses and because she was so easy-going. She had an idea for a backless dress once, and I had to do some things that weren't in her plan to make it stay on her :) She never got annoyed or picky, and looked great in the final result.

One dress I made for another person I sponsored was a complete accident. I had been working on something else and it was just not coming out at all. So then we were digging through my piles of fabric and I held something up. She said "oh, I like that" and suddenly an idea for an entire dress popped into my head. I told her about it and she loved it, so we took it from there.
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#40
Laura said:
In both cases they approached me to make them a dress (at my usual rates), but because I liked them so much I offered to sponsor them. I knew these were people who could really use a bit of help, and would really appreciate it.



Yes.



No one else has asked.



Yes, except for one, but that was also the first dress I ever made for someone else so it wasn't that fabulous to begin with.



I like it when the dancer has a good idea of what she wants, but isn't actually picky about how things come out. I used to love working with one of the people I'd sponsor -- she'd say something like "I need it to be very simple, and black, and have long sleeves" and I'd take it from there. She was great because she'd stone her own dresses and because she was so easy-going. She had an idea for a backless dress once, and I had to do some things that weren't in her plan to make it stay on her :) She never got annoyed or picky, and looked great in the final result.

One dress I made for another person I sponsored was a complete accident. I had been working on something else and it was just not coming out at all. So then we were digging through my piles of fabric and I held something up. She said "oh, I like that" and suddenly an idea for an entire dress popped into my head. I told her about it and she loved it, so we took it from there.
I wish you lived in chicago....
 

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