Best New Songs

Miss Silly

Well-Known Member
THere already is a chacha-fied version of that somewhere.... maybe one of the dj's threw it up on soundcloud or something. It's on my ipod but I got a bunch on newer stuff recently from my coach. I'm not sure where she finds it. But yah, it's a good one ;-)
 

MaggieMoves

Well-Known Member
@MaggieMoves, I am still totally new at this, and I am curious, what makes this song a social Cha Cha vs a normal Cha Cha? Is it the Bpm?
I'm sure someone could better answer this than me. I have little musical background and for me - it's much more mathematical and analytic for me to pick it out.

The staccato isn't as "sharp" as something you'd find for a competition song, and if you play with different timing you have to flub it a bit. It still has elements in it to be qualified as something you'd dance socially though.

@Miss Silly mentioned that there was a "cha cha-fied" version out there. This is more something you'd find on a competition floor.

 
I'm sure someone could better answer this than me. I have little musical background and for me - it's much more mathematical and analytic for me to pick it out.

The staccato isn't as "sharp" as something you'd find for a competition song, and if you play with different timing you have to flub it a bit. It still has elements in it to be qualified as something you'd dance socially though.

@Miss Silly mentioned that there was a "cha cha-fied" version out there. This is more something you'd find on a competition floor.

Thank you for explaining! I also have very little musical background, but I think I understand what you are saying. I can definitely hear the difference between the two songs. With the addition of the Latin instruments, the edited cha cha version has a crisper or more traditional cha cha song sound to it.
 
THere already is a chacha-fied version of that somewhere.... maybe one of the dj's threw it up on soundcloud or something. It's on my ipod but I got a bunch on newer stuff recently from my coach. I'm not sure where she finds it. But yah, it's a good one ;-)
@Miss Silly I am building a playlist, so if you have time and/or want to post some of those new songs...;)
 

Miss Silly

Well-Known Member
@MaggieMoves, I am still totally new at this, and I am curious, what makes this song a social Cha Cha vs a normal Cha Cha? Is it the Bpm?
Just to elaborate on the above, if you play the original and the cha-cha version one after another, you're ears will pick up the difference. Aside from 'appropriate bmp', there are rhythmic characteristics of each dance that make it what it is. So cha cha - with it's distinctive 4&1 - will be amplified quite a bit with the percussion... So you can hear in the original, there isn't really much to emphasize that "cha cha" (the 4&1 counts), compared to the cha-cha-fied version.

Usually when they take a pop song and turn it into dance music, they'll just basically tweak the tempo and overlay a percussion track that's signature to that dance style. LIke in a rumba, generally always has an overlay of congas and sometimes (although not always) even with the classical bossa nova rhythm in there with something like a clave. Here's a song example that's been rumba-fied and you'll easily hear that signature percussive "rumba sound":



OR sometimes the song gets re-recorded with a new singer/band in the appropriate style (kind of like a cover song).
 
Just to elaborate on the above, if you play the original and the cha-cha version one after another, you're ears will pick up the difference. Aside from 'appropriate bmp', there are rhythmic characteristics of each dance that make it what it is. So cha cha - with it's distinctive 4&1 - will be amplified quite a bit with the percussion... So you can hear in the original, there isn't really much to emphasize that "cha cha" (the 4&1 counts), compared to the cha-cha-fied version.

Usually when they take a pop song and turn it into dance music, they'll just basically tweak the tempo and overlay a percussion track that's signature to that dance style. LIke in a rumba, generally always has an overlay of congas and sometimes (although not always) even with the classical bossa nova rhythm in there with something like a clave. Here's a song example that's been rumba-fied and you'll easily hear that signature percussive "rumba sound":



OR sometimes the song gets re-recorded with a new singer/band in the appropriate style (kind of like a cover song).
@Miss Silly, Somehow I am just now seeing this, sorry about that.
Thank you for explaining! Ok, yes, that makes sense, I can definitely hear the differences.

The addition of percussion helps a lot, here is a samba example I found.

Here is the original song

VS

Samba Version
 

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