Competitive ballroom is demanding; cardiac events and the need to address them at comps

debmc

Well-Known Member
#61
Firemen, Policemen, First Responders, Emergency Personnel.... they are often in the ballroom too and are trained at CPR and AEDs... if there is an AED available.

IF.
I agree. The thing is, although I fully support lay persons being trained in CPR and AED use...experience in real life situations helps tremendously. It is one thing to say 'I am trained in CPR and AED use', but quite another thing to be calm and confident during an actual resuscitation. That comes from experience.
 

Akita

Well-Known Member
#62
If NDCA and USA Dance sit on the fence, I might just buy a personal AED and take it to my comps. At least I will know one is available.

amazon.com/Philips-HeartStart-Home-Defibrillator-AED/dp/B00064CED6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396461439&sr=8-1&keywords=aed
 

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#63
I did. I take it with me. But because it is MINE, I do not leave it unattended in the ballroom. I make sure that organizers know that I will have it with me when I am working in the ballroom. And if anything were to happen I would gladly turn the button over to a trained professional... but at least there would be an AED on the floor within 30 seconds.
 
Last edited:

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#64
They are not. Hotel chains do not require them of their franchisees. Individual hotel managers may or may not choose to equip their facility with them. Anytime you enter a hotel you should ask if they have it, where it is located, and who is responsible for it. Most of the staff will stare at you with a blank look on their face and say "I dunno..."





They are simply afraid of a civil liable suit. As it was put to me in the meeting... "My son was a cop. And anyone with two nickels can sue you." .... Ok, so what, my husband IS a cop right now! But what does that have to do with these men who are dead on the floor?

And anyone can sue you for anything, that is true.
They can sue you if you have an AED. They can sue you if you don't.
So why not have one, and save John and Steves life?

The fact is that these people on the floor, Pros such as Steve, or amateurs like John, are the VERY REASON OUR INDUSTRY EXISTS. And to blow off our responsibility to provide a safe environment to the people that are paying THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS to be there.... just plain sad.
interesting... I wonder if it varies state to state or the guy was just wrong...I will check, as this is important to me...that is why I asked....at any rate, I feel the same way about liability issues....it takes a special kind of sick to sue someone who is trying to save you...I would still always err that way
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#65
I did. I take it with me. But because it is MINE, I do not leave it unattended in the ballroom. I make sure that organizers know that I will have it with me when I am working in the ballroom. And if anything were to happen I would gladly turn the button over to a trained professional... but at least there would be an AED on the floor within 30 seconds.
that's awesome...a bunch of folks are now going to want to know your comp schedule :) or to rent from you
 

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#67
It is tested monthly, to be compliant.

The batteries are supposed to last around 5 years... but you are required to test it monthly just to be sure. The pads last about the same length of time, but once used they must be replaced.
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#68
are they the type of batter that is standard for replacement or some spcialized type you have to purchase throughmedical supply....just curious because I am totally in favor of getting one myself...hey, I have family members who are high risk
 
#69
This thread got me thinking more about heart issues and their causes. I found a place that gives a pretty good explanation about Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) vs Heart Attack (see link below).

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/scda/

The AED device apparently can make a big difference in the case of SCA.

I wish comp organizers would provide emergency procedure info and contacts, including AED access procedures. I also think the NDCA should also provide some guidance on this. Not sure how to make anything happen.

pruthe
 

Bailamosdance

Well-Known Member
#70
Simple solution: every competition sanctioned by the org that we are a member of, must provide this. Or, they are not sanctioned. Bigger issue: no medical presence. Also, needs to be a stipulation.
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#71
perhaps ask some of the people in charge who spend half THEIR time in the ballroom, whether or not they are sure that THEY won't have a heart attack while in the ballroom......
 

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#72
interesting... I wonder if it varies state to state or the guy was just wrong...I will check, as this is important to me...that is why I asked....
Usually it is a city wide ordinance that determines whether or not a hotel or convention center will supply one. Perhaps the fireman you asked is in a municipality where there is such an ordinance. And so for that city, he was right, hotels are required to have one.
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#74
Usually it is a city wide ordinance that determines whether or not a hotel or convention center will supply one. Perhaps the fireman you asked is in a municipality where there is such an ordinance. And so for that city, he was right, hotels are required to have one.
probably....
 

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#75
Simple solution: every competition sanctioned by the org that we are a member of, must provide this. Or, they are not sanctioned. Bigger issue: no medical presence. Also, needs to be a stipulation.
The NDCA motion that we, the PDF, put forward was "Each organizer is required to have an AED on deck... OR a person in the ballroom at all times that is CPR and AED certified.... OR Each organizer must have an emergency personel on staff." Or something to that effect. I forget because it was over a year ago. But basically we made the motion to have several components that could be accepted or changed. And we were perfectly willing to negotiate the terms.

When I presented the motion I did almost did not even receive a "second", as required by RRO. I presented the facts, the room argued. We then realized that the motion would die with the PDF being the sole organization to vote in its favor. So we tabled the motion indefinitely, which was the only option to take, otherwise it would have been defeated and we would not have been able to reopen the motion again ever, at a later date.
 
Last edited:

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#76

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#78
The machine knows.
The machine will deliver a shock ONLY if it is Sudden Cardiac Arrest.
The machine will NOT deliver a shock if it is a Heart Attack or in any case if it detects a pulse.
 

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#79
are they the type of batter that is standard for replacement or some spcialized type you have to purchase throughmedical supply....just curious because I am totally in favor of getting one myself...hey, I have family members who are high risk
The batteries and pads are specific to that machine and would be replaced through the vendor.
 

dbk

Well-Known Member
#80
A petition might not force a change to happen, but the point is to bring more attention to the issue. It could give organizations like USAD a kick in the pants, as well as making competitors aware of the problem... I'm sure a lot of competitors would be shocked to know that these regulations aren't already in place.

An online survey with http://www.change.org/petition couldn't hurt, IMO.
 

Dance Ads