Current trends in amateur competition pricing

#61
well, that's what we have now... kinda

newcomers only pay 10 bucks,

and the top prechamp and champ couples do get scholarships a lot of the time that help cover the costs of entering the event...
scholarship is not the same as cheaper registration for higher levels since only a few of the higher levels get money. If Arunas and Edita came to a comp, champ dancers will not want to come for the money.

also, if there's prechamp and champ, people will tend to dance down to get the money.
 

Katarzyna

Well-Known Member
#65
I wonder if anyone can explain why USABDA regional events are more expensive than NDCA events of the same size.. lately...
SRC 150 pp
Chicago 125 pp

Was thinking of going to regional there, have family there etc, but the price of registration is equal of the price of the flight.. Isnt' that ridiculous.. just to dance 1 round, 1 event? What's going on with USABDA, isn't it supposed to support amateurs.. I thought NDCA was supposed to be the "evil one"???
 
#68
scholarship is not the same as cheaper registration for higher levels since only a few of the higher levels get money. If Arunas and Edita came to a comp, champ dancers will not want to come for the money.

also, if there's prechamp and champ, people will tend to dance down to get the money.
what is "dance down"?
I didnt' see anyone breaking rules at Harvard.
If Edita and arunas came, i think just the experience of dancing on the same floor with them would be worth a lot to champ level dancers.


anyway, you are saying scholarships are not a good way of supporting the open level (gold level) dancers...
whats is the alternative?

maybe free/cheaper registration to open level couples traveling from over X number of hours away...
 

Laura

New Member
#74
I wonder if anyone can explain why USABDA regional events are more expensive than NDCA events of the same size.. lately...
SRC 150 pp
Chicago 125 pp
Please. "USA Dance." We haven't been "USABDA" for years.

The local organizing committees set the prices for their events. The National USA Dance organization does not have anything to do with the prices at the various Regionals -- or even at Nationals, as those historically have been set by the local organizing committees.

The prices are based on the production costs, and how much profit the chapters would like to gain from their activities (USA Dance chapters, while being officially non-profit, are allowed to thow competitions as "fundraising events for chapter activities.") It is my understanding that the SRC is considered "the social event of the season" by social dancers in the Atlanta area, and that they expect an elegant event with a show, dinner, dancing, and all that. The organizers plan their event and set their prices accordingly.

As a contrast, at NorCal we're all about doing things at a very low price point, so as to be more inclusive to all dancers. We set the prices for our events on a "break-even" philosophy (however, the low prices have been attracting more and more people over the years, so we don't actually lose money on our events, and are currently looking at ways to use our profits to promote dancing in our local community such as by donating to local college teams and to public school programs that promote health through dancing). But that is just our chapter's philosophy. Not all chapters have this philosophy.

If you want to change what a chapters do, get involved with them if any of them are in your area: get on the Board, or at least ask when the meetings are so you can go to them and argue your points. If no one on a chapter's board or in a chapter makes enough noise, nothing will be changed. Like, the people who have been running and participating in things in Atlanta are satisfied with how things go there, and don't mind that the competition has small fields due in part to the high entry fees. Maybe the organizers there don't even realize that there are competitors out there complaining about their prices...try writing letters to the Chicago and Atlanta people and telling them how you feel, that you'll just do the lower-cost Regional in New Jersey to qualify because you are tired of paying $125 or whatever per person to compete. Maybe someone will hear and understand and start thinking of making a change.
 

Katarzyna

Well-Known Member
#76
Please. "USA Dance." We haven't been "USABDA" for years.

The local organizing committees set the prices for their events. The National USA Dance organization does not have anything to do with the prices at the various Regionals -- or even at Nationals, as those historically have been set by the local organizing committees.

The prices are based on the production costs, and how much profit the chapters would like to gain from their activities (USA Dance chapters, while being officially non-profit, are allowed to thow competitions as "fundraising events for chapter activities.") It is my understanding that the SRC is considered "the social event of the season" by social dancers in the Atlanta area, and that they expect an elegant event with a show, dinner, dancing, and all that. The organizers plan their event and set their prices accordingly.

As a contrast, at NorCal we're all about doing things at a very low price point, so as to be more inclusive to all dancers. We set the prices for our events on a "break-even" philosophy (however, the low prices have been attracting more and more people over the years, so we don't actually lose money on our events, and are currently looking at ways to use our profits to promote dancing in our local community such as by donating to local college teams and to public school programs that promote health through dancing). But that is just our chapter's philosophy. Not all chapters have this philosophy.

If you want to change what a chapters do, get involved with them if any of them are in your area: get on the Board, or at least ask when the meetings are so you can go to them and argue your points. If no one on a chapter's board or in a chapter makes enough noise, nothing will be changed. Like, the people who have been running and participating in things in Atlanta are satisfied with how things go there, and don't mind that the competition has small fields due in part to the high entry fees. Maybe the organizers there don't even realize that there are competitors out there complaining about their prices...try writing letters to the Chicago and Atlanta people and telling them how you feel, that you'll just do the lower-cost Regional in New Jersey to qualify because you are tired of paying $125 or whatever per person to compete. Maybe someone will hear and understand and start thinking of making a change.
Thanks laura, sorry I am just getting frustrated. It's basically because those comps try to include all those extras, like dinner which happens like 20 min before the Champ session so of course couples dancing the night session have to pay the same amount, be the entertainment, and not get to eat.. And charge flat fee for someone to do like 20 events, while we only get to do one.. usually barely contested anyway.. Sorry for this little outburst.. :( I jsut registered online and got the info on the fee and was shocked and annoyed.. :( Of courese it's easier for us to do local regionals and we will anyway, so it's any other comp, and jsut not used to pay so much for comps.. Even Blackpool is cheaper to enter..

oh and sorry about the USABDA.. it's just faster to type..
 

Laura

New Member
#77
I wonder if anyone can explain why USABDA regional events are more expensive than NDCA events of the same size
Also, I wanted to add another reason why NDCA-sanctioned events can charge less for Amateur couples: Pro/Am. The Pro/Am entry fees are quite high and so enable there to be lower entry fees for the Amateurs. To wit, I pay $25-$40 for a SINGLE DANCE entry fee at an NDCA comp, $65-$95 for a NON-scholarship event, and $80-$125 for a Scholarship event. And, to enter the Scholarship, I am required to also enter five single dance events, so in effect the entry fee for my Scholarship event is close to $200. So, with that kind of money coming in from the Pro/Ams, the organizers of NDCA events can afford to cut the Amateur couples a break.
 

Katarzyna

Well-Known Member
#79
Also, I wanted to add another reason why NDCA-sanctioned events can charge less for Amateur couples: Pro/Am. The Pro/Am entry fees are quite high and so enable there to be lower entry fees for the Amateurs. To wit, I pay $25-$40 for a SINGLE DANCE entry fee at an NDCA comp, $65-$95 for a NON-scholarship event, and $80-$125 for a Scholarship event. And, to enter the Scholarship, I am required to also enter five single dance events, so in effect the entry fee for my Scholarship event is close to $200. So, with that kind of money coming in from the Pro/Ams, the organizers of NDCA events can afford to cut the Amateur couples a break.
Thank you, of course, it's just that I always hear people complaining about NDCA fees for AMs, where it's totally the other way around..
 

Laura

New Member
#80
Thanks laura, sorry I am just getting frustrated. It's basically because those comps try to include all those extras, like dinner which happens like 20 min before the Champ session so of course couples dancing the night session have to pay the same amount, be the entertainment, and not get to eat.. And charge flat fee for someone to do like 20 events, while we only get to do one.. usually barely contested anyway.
I agree with you 100%. It really boils down to a difference in philosophy: I guess you could say that an event like the SRC is designed for the spectators first, the local dance community second, and the actual competitors third. Other events, like the Regional that Wendi Davies runs and the Regional out here in California that alternates between San Jose and Anaheim, are designed for the competitors first. Our philosophy is that people are there to get their dancing on, so we focus on that and don't even bother with dinners, entertainment, etc. My personal feeling is that I wish all USA Dance events -- including Nationals (be prepared for some 2007 sticker shock) -- were run with the competitors and cost issues forefront, but as we all can see that is not always the case.
 

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