Enlightening Conversations

#21
words, philosopies, advice religion seem to do nothing to me spiritually but music - specifically playing music, gets me somewhere I can't get any other way ...

[neat thread Larinda..]
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#23
words, philosopies, advice religion seem to do nothing to me spiritually but music - specifically playing music, gets me somewhere I can't get any other way ...

[neat thread Larinda..]
London buses are worth a try

( damn I could resistant a flippant remark)

okay apologies to all.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#25
fwiw, my own research indicates that the buddha's statement that all desire leads to suffering is actually a mistranslation... a correct statement would be along the lines of erroneous or misdirected desire (of the lower or inauthentic self) leading always to suffering.
On Desire and Buddhism:

my take on it is: that if you recognise desire as a thought or feeling that arises and as simply that: a thought or feeling; then you just accept it as part of your self and you don't have to act on it. We do act on some desires because they keep as alive; hunger for instance.

I think desire translates better as expectation; if you give expecting things to be the way you think they "ought" to be then you suffer less. otherwise you become"oughtistic"

but there is also the "wish-fulfilling" which equates to prayer: that one wishes for all beings to be free from anxiety;(for example) wich is there to help us develop compassion.
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#26
I am so happy to see this thread. Re Larinda's mention of Neale Donald Wlash's "Conversations with God", IMHO, if one hasn't read this series...go get it, now. Books I and III are easier to understand for the layman or new to spiritual learning, and would be my urge. Book II could be a wee out there for the uninitiated. Though there are some Aha! moments, this reading will change your life, ...not in a thunder bursting way, but as subtle and gentle breeze that almost went unnoticed.

Another must read for those of us who are consistently on the path, is "The Wisdom of Florence Scovell Shinn". This is a collection of her only 4 books...a very short, but powerful read. The first, "The Game of Life (and How to Play it)" is still one of the best 'guidance' books available. I carry "The Wisdom of..." with me everywhere...everyday.
.
Personally, am not big fan of the Conversations books, although I have read them all. I find them more disinforming but...like anything else they can have their place.

I do love Florence Scovell Shinn...have had her Game of Life by my bed for many years, and her other works have inspired me deeply many, many times. I studied Christian Science (not Scientology) and ACIM for many years, and she is on the same wavelength as those teachings...but in a simpler, more direct voice.
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#27
On Desire and Buddhism:

my take on it is: that if you recognise desire as a thought or feeling that arises and as simply that: a thought or feeling; then you just accept it as part of your self and you don't have to act on it. We do act on some desires because they keep as alive; hunger for instance.

I think desire translates better as expectation; if you give expecting things to be the way you think they "ought" to be then you suffer less. otherwise you become"oughtistic"

but there is also the "wish-fulfilling" which equates to prayer: that one wishes for all beings to be free from anxiety;(for example) wich is there to help us develop compassion.
I'm referring more to desire as the voice of the heart...the heart's desire...and how potent it is to work with that as an agent for manifesting. But it is shut down, clamped down against very frequently, because of resistance against the "unrequited" feeling of something not yet manifest. Takes a powerful rootedness in gratitude and certainty of fulfillment to go there.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#28
Enough; aside from my hyapotheosis that one needs an usual name to write a philosphical self-help book; I'm going for self-hindrance:

instead of" The Wisdom of.........
I will have "The Stupidity of.........B. Tan-Goman"
lying between Don Quixote ( windmills; a guide to tilting at) and Baron Von Munchausen
and why the medical profession has given Von M a bad name; quite unneccessarilly)*

* The film rights are going to Terry Gilliam that celluloid master of the fantastical.
 

Angel HI

Well-Known Member
#30
I do love Florence Scovell Shinn...have had her Game of Life by my bed for many years, and her other works have inspired me deeply many, many times.
Another great read, but one must seriously be on a path to understand much of it, is "A Course in Miracles". Marianne Williamson, its most well known proponent but not author or original member, is simply fabulous. With 'Course", she is another read that is at the bedside, always.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#31
Another great read, but one must seriously be on a path to understand much of it, is "A Course in Miracles". Marianne Williamson, its most well known proponent but not author or original member, is simply fabulous. With 'Course", she is another read that is at the bedside, always.
Of course the mistake that I and others make is to think that the answers lie in a book.

The real answers lie within oneself and the world around.
 

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#33
Of course the mistake that I and others make is to think that the answers lie in a book.

The real answers lie within oneself and the world around.
I think that is what I like about Buddhism, that everything around you is your question, teacher, and answer... Every interaction, every situation... everything is wrapped up in one moment. Everything you need is right there.
 

samina

Well-Known Member
#34
Another great read, but one must seriously be on a path to understand much of it, is "A Course in Miracles". Marianne Williamson, its most well known proponent but not author or original member, is simply fabulous. With 'Course", she is another read that is at the bedside, always.
i don't study mine any longer, but i have two copies packed away...one is in tatters from so much study. ;)
 

DL

Well-Known Member
#38
I think that is what I like about Buddhism, that everything around you is your question, teacher, and answer... Every interaction, every situation... everything is wrapped up in one moment. Everything you need is right there.
Properly viewed, religion never, "has all the answers" (and indeed a claim to the contrary is often the hallmark of a cult). Rather, it provides a set of tools for examining the questions.
 

Angel HI

Well-Known Member
#39
Properly viewed, religion never, "has all the answers" ....
Starting a war, I know, but...there is a profound difference between religion, spiritualism, and existentialism (the latter 2 more referenced in this thread). :car: I'm outta here...........................
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#40
right...and I will add that if it became solely about religionand the merits for or against it, the thread would cease to exist...this is about folks lovingly sharing small pieces of concepts from various places including various faith traditions that have assisted them on their way
 

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