fake tan and make up again

fascination

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Staff member
#81
Michelle DiMascio said:
I know there are people out there with skin that tans evenly. That is to say that the start of abnormal cells in less likely to occur. People with skin like that are less likely to have problems, but they still could.

I'm half Italian and I still freckle like my Irish/Lithuanian part!

Just please be careful.
thank you...I intend to
 
#82
i have been taking MQs suggestion of buying Coppertone in the dual-pump container (the lotion.) i like it so far and have been test-running it these past few weeks.

however, yesterday i went to a tanning place to try to buy some SuperBraun, which was recommended to me by someone else. we were comparing tans, the receptionist and i, and she noted my (Coppertone) was 'a little orange.'

now i'm all self-conscious. do the expensive self-tanners like SuperBraun really create a brown, rather than orange, tan?
 

Laura

New Member
#84
I researched this at one point and found that the official story is that the active ingredient in all the self-tanners is the same. It reacts with your own skin to make the color. The difference in the brands is based on non-tanning ingredients and the concentration of the active tanning ingredient. If you want to ensure brown-ness, then use a dye or paint like Pro-Tan. Well, that's the official story.

However, I swear that some brands, regardless of price, come out differently on me. For instance, Lancome -- rather expensive -- comes out quite yellowish, whereas Neutrogena -- a drugstore brand -- seems to work pretty well. My personal favorite is Estee' Lauder, but another friend swears by the generic Long's Drugs (a California chain) house brand.

My advice is to not get tricked into buying an expensive brand unless you've been able to test it yourself. Maybe you could find a friend or two and each buy a brand you've been wanting to try, and then test each other's to see what works best for you.
 
#85
i think the variables are, as you say

(1) the 'other' ingredients
(2) my skin.

laura - that is a FABULOUS idea. SELF TANNER PARTY AT LAURA'S HOUSE!!!!



(agree with you about Neutrogena, btw - it's worked quite well for me.)


i am stressing about this at the moment because, first of all, i have a comp on saturday, and secondly, i was commanded to get darker this time. exact words: "i need you really dark."

um, ok. i'll get... right on that.
 

skwiggy

Well-Known Member
#86
Yup, the brands react differently on different people. Neutrogena looks orange on me, but I've seen it work well on other people.
 
#87
I was actually wondering the same thing (orange vs. brown). I tend to use neutrogena bc it dries the quickest - ie, convenient, but I've tried many drugstore self tanners and find that once you apply multiple coats (regardless of tanner, although some are worse than others), it starts to look more and more orange (as opposed to just doing one coat and looking more or less 'naturally' tan).
On the other hand, I've watched comp videos of myself, and I don't look orange in the videos, so it may not be that big of a deal. However, I wouldn't mind getting darker...but if you can only achieve that with paint, I guess I'll have to pass - there's a certain minimum standard of expected appearance at work, and post-comp patchiness probably doesn't qualify *sigh*
 

Laura

New Member
#88
Maybe as more and more normal people -- people with jobs and lives outside dancesport -- get into competing, the stress on having a deep dark "Latin" tan (whatever the hell that is -- I've been watching "Bailando por un Sueno" and am noticing that the people on that show are all of skin/hair types) will go down. I've always found it to be kind of ridiculous to expected to go so dark that you must paint yourself with a pigment like Pro Tan to be considered acceptable.

Natural-looking, with no pastiness: good.
Overtanned: not so sexy after all, kinda gross in that weird weighlifting kind of way.
 

mamboqueen

Well-Known Member
#89
Laura said:
Maybe as more and more normal people -- people with jobs and lives outside dancesport -- get into competing, the stress on having a deep dark "Latin" tan (whatever the hell that is -- I've been watching "Bailando por un Sueno" and am noticing that the people on that show are all of skin/hair types) will go down. I've always found it to be kind of ridiculous to expected to go so dark that you must paint yourself with a pigment like Pro Tan to be considered acceptable.

Natural-looking, with no pastiness: good.
Overtanned: not so sexy after all, kinda gross in that weird weighlifting kind of way.

I agree. And it would sure save me a lot of time/money/aggravation/living with a smell I hate .... if it were scaled back a bit. Honestly, are there even studies that show what damage all the chemicals we put on our bodies are doing?? Pro Tan cannot possibly be good for your skin, or why lies beneath it. As much as I would never use a tanning bed, there's no guarantee that all these self-tanning products are going to be any safer in the long run.
 
#90
Overcoming pastiness, great idea. However, sometimes I find even a "tasteful" tan can cross the line when you have light natural (not bleach blonde) hair....it creates such a strange dynamic on the face that I find very unattractive. Over-emphasises the tan, I find....and while it might fit in for the ballroom stereotype, it's just not nice in the real world.
 

mamboqueen

Well-Known Member
#91
Well, at the point it becomes seriously unnatural, it looks all the more ridiculous. You don't find many blue-eyed redheads running around with dark skin...not naturally, anyway.
 

Laura

New Member
#92
Google tells me:
What is DHA?

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, the most effective sunless tanning products contain dihydroxyacetone (DHA) as the active ingredient. DHA is a colorless chemical (it is derived from glycerin) that interacts with the amino acids in dead skin cells to produce a brown color change. Since these dead skin cells are constantly being shed, the color change produced by DHA usually lasts about five to seven days.

DHA is not absorbed through the skin into the body and it has no known toxicity. DHA was first discovered by the Germans in the late 1920's when DHA spilled on the skin produced a brown color. DHA has been listed with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1973, and has been used in cosmetic preparations for almost 30 years.
I researched this a couple of years ago the last time the question of toxicity came up on these lists, and couldn't find anything that indicated that it was a problem for external application.
 
#95
yanka said:
However, I wouldn't mind getting darker...but if you can only achieve that with paint, I guess I'll have to pass
I'm still not sure that I understand why so many people on here seem soo scared of protan. You cover your skin with a coat of it at a time, just like you would with any other sunless tanner and then wash it off hours later leaving you with a fake tan. The color definately looks better than most other brands (very noticable difference when compared next to each other). On top of that, protan wears off the same as any other brand of sunless tanner. You're going to have a certain amount of splotchyness no matter what brand you choose.
 

Laura

New Member
#96
It's not so much the substance, it's just the principle of having to use it to make yourself fit in with a very narrow and stereotypical definition of what makes a so-called "Latin" dancer.

At least you can use color remover to take it off afterwards -- I think Larinda has mentioned this substance before.
 

Twilight_Elena

Well-Known Member
#98
Joe said:
You don't even find two out of those three! ;)
Good point, Joe. ;)
I have natural dark hair and eyes, but my skin is very pale. I was thinking that perhaps a natural looking tan (not so dark as the ones you see in comps) would be the way to go, something like those moisturisers you use for 2-3 weeks and you gradually get a more tanned hue.

Twilight Elena
 

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