Favorite Waltz Music

#41
<snip> Although unless they've been strict-tempoed the tempo changes make them really hard to dance to.
For social dancing (choreography on the fly) or competition (set choreography to strict tempo) I agree. I've wondered, though, if it matters that much for a showcase. If a singer or orchestra can negotiate tempo changes, why can't a dancer?

It would take some analysis and some practice, but if it truly follows beautiful music... Why not?
 

NielsenE

Active Member
#43
I really love the song Greenwaves, the version done by Secret Garden on "Once in a Red Moon". Its slightly different than the one played at some competitions; this version has a few retards in the opening that I think would be nice to play with in a showcase.
 

and123

Well-Known Member
#46
Well, whaddaya know. So it is. That's a new one to me. I thought you made some sort of wild typo up there. I have no formal music training. Sorry!:oops:
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#49
Well, without hearing the music, and not being completely up on my musical terminology...

I'd wager that the slowing and stretching of the time signature are probably various fermatas (holds), instead of ritardandos. The difference, IIRC, is that a ritard. is a gradual, even slowing throughout the measure (or measures), whereas a fermata is a holding of a particular note/beat/whatever, while what comes before and after is generally at tempo. Again, IIRC. Cornutt or I_J would probably know better.

I don't see why, if you're doing it for a showcase and therefore have the ability to plan the choreography around the music, you couldn't use it anyway. Granted, I've never done a showcase and have no experience with choreography, so what do I know? (Answer: nothing.)
 
#50
I don't see why, if you're doing it for a showcase and therefore have the ability to plan the choreography around the music, you couldn't use it anyway. Granted, I've never done a showcase and have no experience with choreography, so what do I know?

Answer: Quite a lot. Isn't choreography supposed to be the selection and arrangement of movements to interpret and illuminate a piece of music? If, for example, whole orchestras can follow changes in tempo or if singers can stretch notes and phrases while the orchestra waits for them, why can't dancers follow such variations?

One of the things I find most unsatisfying about most competition dancing is the competitor's inability to suit the dance to the music. I often see them performing the exact same routine in preliminaries and finals to totally different music in each heat. "Ornaments" and "emphatics" (such as picture lines, spins, and such) which might work wonderfully when performed with the music often end up a measure or two before or after the musical "ornament". So the entire dance seems out of kilter and artificial, rather than an on target and an organic blend of the dance and music. (Sometimes they win anyway.)

In a showcase, unlike a competition or social dance, you have the chance to analyze a piece of music and arrange the dance specifically for it. Including any tempo changes. You can to put the ornaments in the music and ornaments in the dance together.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#51
You should try AT. The difference between AT where the focus is specifically on musical interpretation, wher a good leader can play with the music and the rhythm and highlight various things (vocals, beat, an instrument) versus ballroom is just staggering. Even when there's no routine involved, ballroom just feels so...sterile...compared to AT that way. Of course, I still love it, but for other reasons.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#55
*highjack alert*
i keep monitoring this thread looking for good waltz songs, but the conversation has evidentally taken a turn......
Well, what kind of a feel are you looking for? Do you prefer the classic tunes (Fascination, my version is by Al Martino, IIRC), or alternative stuff (She's Leaving Home, by The Beatles--although it's fast, or You Make Me Feel (Like a Natural Woman) by Aretha Franklin)? Do you like syncopation (Buster Keaton, by Childsplay) or not? Something mid-tempo, or very slow, or verry fast? A standard of ballroom waltzing that everyone loves, or do you want to find something new and unusual? What feel are you going for with your showcase? Do you have any theme in mind?
 
#56
Well, what kind of a feel are you looking for? Do you prefer the classic tunes (Fascination, my version is by Al Martino, IIRC), or alternative stuff (She's Leaving Home, by The Beatles--although it's fast, or You Make Me Feel (Like a Natural Woman) by Aretha Franklin)? Do you like syncopation (Buster Keaton, by Childsplay) or not? Something mid-tempo, or very slow, or verry fast? A standard of ballroom waltzing that everyone loves, or do you want to find something new and unusual? What feel are you going for with your showcase? Do you have any theme in mind?
We are looking for a faster waltz, but not quite viennese. Something with playful music that lots of lifts could be choreographed to (crescendos and the like). Very open to unconventional music, but want the overall feel of the song to upbeat (not depressing or sad) like the couple is in love.
haha any suggestions? :D
 
#57
We are looking for a faster waltz, but not quite viennese. Something with playful music that lots of lifts could be choreographed to (crescendos and the like). Very open to unconventional music, but want the overall feel of the song to upbeat (not depressing or sad) like the couple is in love.
haha any suggestions? :D
So She Dances - Josh Groban
Si Volvieras a Mi - Josh Groban
My, My, My - Rob Thomas
Runaway - The Corrs (probably too fast, but it's a beautiful love song)
I'll Be - Edwin McCain
Mystery Man - Lesley Pike

If these are too fast or not what you're looking for, let me know and I'll see what else I can come up with. :)
 

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