Getting criticised on my tango walk by a newbie!

If you exit in cross system, there is no need to walk her into the cross either. There are other ways to switch back to parallel system if you wish to do so.
However, I guess the Twinkltoz' point was that her partner could not keep track of what foot she was on, and on top sorta blamed her for that.
 

twnkltoz

Well-Known Member
If you exit in cross system, there is no need to walk her into the cross either. There are other ways to switch back to parallel system if you wish to do so.
However, I guess the Twinkltoz' point was that her partner could not keep track of what foot she was on, and on top sorta blamed her for that.
Yes, that's what I was trying to get at.
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
I am almost sure, a few ladies he regularly dances with in a similar situation would actually accommodate and switch on their own ;)
I suppose they would.

Their choice would seem to be, either be obstinate or try to get through this tanda. That is, either do what you think he's trying to lead, or only do what he actually leads. In class I suggest that followers only do what is lead. At a milonga, I don't know. I think it's a tough choice for followers. What do you suggest?
 
I suppose they would.

Their choice would seem to be, either be obstinate or try to get through this tanda. That is, either do what you think he's trying to lead, or only do what he actually leads. In class I suggest that followers only do what is lead. At a milonga, I don't know. I think it's a tough choice for followers. What do you suggest?
I do not think it is a tough choice. When I go to a milonga, I assume everyone is there to dance tango, which is a dance based on musical improvisation and connection between two partners (lead and follow).
When I agree to dance with a person in a milonga, he/she has to be able to lead, at least some. Otherwise that dancer does not belong in a milonga just yet. I guess, people who have a different opinion on that matter just do not ask me to dance... they actually do not even go to the same milonga.
If some things my partner wanted to lead, like the cross or whatever, did not work, it does not matter. If he gets upset over something that he tried and it did not work, or did not work as smoothly as he would like, I tell him just that: it does not matter. So, just smile (or laugh), and carry on.
I shall say, I have not fell on a criticizing partner in ages.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
I do not think it is a tough choice. When I go to a milonga, I assume everyone is there to dance tango, which is a dance based on musical improvisation and connection between two partners (lead and follow).
When I agree to dance with a person in a milonga, he/she has to be able to lead, at least some. Otherwise that dancer does not belong in a milonga just yet. I guess, people who have a different opinion on that matter just do not ask me to dance... they actually do not even go to the same milonga.
If some things my partner wanted to lead, like the cross or whatever, did not work, it does not matter. If he gets upset over something that he tried and it did not work, or did not work as smoothly as he would like, I tell him just that: it does not matter. So, just smile (or laugh), and carry on.
I shall say, I have not fell on a criticizing partner in ages.
Now this philosophy I agree with. Mistakes happen from time to time, and it's just not that important. If a follower doesn't do what I expected, I just deal with it and I'm on to the next step. If I think it was because my lead stunk, maybe I'd try to do it better if appropriate. Sometimes a follower will say sorry, and I'll say, "that's not needed", or something to that effect.
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
...When I agree to dance with a person in a milonga, he/she has to be able to lead, at least some. Otherwise that dancer does not belong in a milonga just yet...
That seems stringent to me: either you are or you aren't - no exceptions.

I like to think that experienced dancers will be helpful and supportive of less-experienced dancers and they will cut some slack in order to encourage new comers. I think there should be a shade of gray in there somewhere where experienced followers (leaders, too) will try to be helpful to people who are trying to learn this dance. In other words, you'll be willing to give him a step for a sincere effort, rather than demand perfection.

I am not saying you need to accept his instructions on how to do the step.
 
That seems stringent to me: either you are or you aren't - no exceptions.

I like to think that experienced dancers will be helpful and supportive of less-experienced dancers and they will cut some slack in order to encourage new comers. I think there should be a shade of gray in there somewhere where experienced followers (leaders, too) will try to be helpful to people who are trying to learn this dance. In other words, you'll be willing to give him a step for a sincere effort, rather than demand perfection.

I am not saying you need to accept his instructions on how to do the step.
That is why I said -- "at least some". I do not believe it is too much to ask that a person who shows up at social dances and who expects people to dance with him or her learned to lead (or follow) at least some.
Where in my post did you see that I demanded perfection, is a mystery to me.
 

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