Happy and/or Random Thoughts #3

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
wonders what would happen to new york if we had a tsunami instead of a storm.

What the heck is it with you, manny? Have you lived through cyclones or tsunamis yourself? Sounds like it. Yes. You're right. A category one is only the beginning, but it's still a hurricane and (obviously) can create quite a lot of carnage, both literally and figuratively.


And yeah. I thought about what things might have been like if Sandy had been a category three, four or five instead of a weakening category one, when it made landfall. Yikes. I'm just glad that it wasn't.
 
What the heck is it with you, manny? Have you lived through cyclones or tsunamis yourself? Sounds like it. Yes. You're right. A category one is only the beginning, but it's still a hurricane and (obviously) can create quite a lot of carnage, both literally and figuratively.


And yeah. I thought about what things might have been like if Sandy had been a category three, four or five instead of a weakening category one, when it made landfall. Yikes. I'm just glad that it wasn't.
LOL, you are taking this totally the wrong way. I am saying this storm partly paralized this 22+ million people city. So a tsunami would do massive, really massive damage. Therefore the city should really think and do something about that.
 

samina

Well-Known Member
What the heck is it with you, manny? Have you lived through cyclones or tsunamis yourself? Sounds like it. Yes. You're right. A category one is only the beginning, but it's still a hurricane and (obviously) can create quite a lot of carnage, both literally and figuratively.


And yeah. I thought about what things might have been like if Sandy had been a category three, four or five instead of a weakening category one, when it made landfall. Yikes. I'm just glad that it wasn't.
Sandy had a low pressure of around 940 mb when it made landfall. My research indicated that is closer to a Cat 3 than a Cat 1, and there were some readings that Sandy had wind speeds at 96 knots, also in the Cat 3 zone. Whatever the official story, those were my observations before/as she made landfall. And if you look at the devastation on the Jersey shore, that's also more like Cat 3 or more damage. Just sayin'...make of it what you will.
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
I never have understood exactly how these things are measured. *shrug* And yeah, the devastation doesn't look like category one, to me, either.

Many moons ago, a category one swept through Orlando, where I lived at the time. The ex was out of town. So I brought in the patio furniture and got a good night's sleep, in the house, all by myself. No worries. Back to work the next afternoon. With the category three's I've experienced, no such thing would have been possible. Who knows?

In any case, as I noted a couple days back, it can be the side and/or after effects that cause the most damage. During the storms (at least back in Orlando) it was tornadoes we were afraid of. During and after storms, it was flooding.

As much as the pictures of overall devastation get me, it's the personal stories that touch me the most. Yesterday the folks on NPR interviewed a lady in coastal NJ who chose not to evacuate because she has two ailing octogenarian parents. (The evacuation during hurricane Irene last year was very hard on her parents.) She said that on Monday, when she called for help, the first responders told her that she'd had a chance to evacuate before and that, on Monday, there was nothing they could do. She told them, 'Okay, then let me give you a body count. There are four of us." She said this while water was pouring into her house right over all the sandbags she'd piled up. Wow. :(
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
LOL, you are taking this totally the wrong way. I am saying this storm partly paralized this 22+ million people city. So a tsunami would do massive, really massive damage. Therefore the city should really think and do something about that.
I'm not taking it in any particular way. Just raising a flag that, to me (and in the context of your comments in another thread) it sounds like you may be minimizing the tragedy that so many people are experiencing. Maybe that's not your intent. That's how it's coming across to me. I do know that the intent behind a persons comments and the impact of ones comments can be very different things. That's why I asked. :cool:

And yes. I agree. Big cities in the Northeast are probably not as well-prepared for this type of thing as they could be. Historically, hurricanes really haven't been that much of an issue in the Mid-Atlantic, Northeast and New England. Houses in historically hurricane-prone areas actually have different building specs. In the Northeast, IME, house are built with great insulation against extremes of heat and especially cold. In hurricane-prone areas, they're built reinforced against high winds. *shrug*
 

Joe

Well-Known Member
As much as the pictures of overall devastation get me, it's the personal stories that touch me the most. Yesterday the folks on NPR interviewed a lady in coastal NJ who chose not to evacuate because she has two ailing octogenarian parents. (The evacuation during hurricane Irene last year was very hard on her parents.) She said that on Monday, when she called for help, the first responders told her that she'd had a chance to evacuate before and that, on Monday, there was nothing they could do. She told them, 'Okay, then let me give you a body count. There are four of us." She said this while water was pouring into her house right over all the sandbags she'd piled up. Wow. :(
But what's your point? That the first responders should have come to get them anyway?
 

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