Help! At a crossroad between latin and standard?

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#21
I would also note that I would never assume that a lack of balance on the part of a lady would be the fault of her pro...while addressing it should be a goal, her not having it, would not necessarily be on her pro KWIM?
 
#22
I would also note that I would never assume that a lack of balance on the part of a lady would be the fault of her pro...while addressing it should be a goal, her not having it, would not necessarily be on her pro KWIM?
Love your point. That's true, it's always easier to blame it on somebody else ;)

However, I still think there might be the possibility that, very rarely, a pro contributes to a student's problem (whether it be balance or something else), so while I would tend to agree your opinion, I wouldn't rule this option out, especially if it's a problem that keeps happening across a variety of students as well as this guy's partner.

With the highest respect to anybody who is dancing on this high a level, at least around here some people are just brutal. Dancing on a high competitive level does not always mean dancing well/ not "killing" your partner.
 
#24
I guess what I'm trying to get at is I would go for the better instructor and at least give it a lesson or two. :D You never know what may happen!
Yes, your point is right. I think I'll take a lesson or two from the standard instructor. Hopefully my now latin instructor won't be upset haha

No idea if you though about the following aspect:
Regardless of the standard/latin question: Every coach will teach you what he or she knows/ does/ promotes. So you will learn whatever idea of movement your coach has. Additionally, as a follower, you have the chance to learn by adapting to a leader's way of moving, leading... (especially if you are going to dance with your instructor a lot).


To be honest, from what I've read both latin coaches don't strike my fancy - the standard guy sounds like the best option right now: IME it is very difficult to get hold of an excellent coach who has both the knowledge and the teaching skills to help you progress quickly - and with your experience in ballet and jazz you already have your mechanics right. Don't underestimate the amount of time it might take you to get things right later once you've learned things incorrectly. A guy who might or might not really understand his body and applies too much force might cause damage to both your dancing and your body.

You will be going to college soon and you have plenty of time ahead of you to do whatever style you wish. With some standard experience you will then be able to make an informed decision to pursue standard, latin or both.
You brought up many good points as well. Though the latin instructor is good at dancing with high level dancers I'm worried about him and my very bronze self :) I take a group class with him once a week or once every other week depending and he has lacked with teaching us technique which I think really holds the group back. I have noticed that the technique of his students are not nearly as good as the technique of the standard instructor. And it would be good if I had experience in both so then I could make a real decision what I like and what I don't like.
 

fascination

Site Moderator
Staff member
#26
I have always been leery of high level dancers who have no technically proficient students...now any good teacher could have a few students with limitations, or who don't really want to improve, but if a guy is truly high level and that is not reflected in ANY of his students, he's either a crappy teacher or doesn't care...or both...that being said, I would not presume that the level of technique that one teaches in a group is in any way indicative of the level of technique they would teach on a private...particularly if they know you are focused on competing...lastly, I would not worry about your level being too low for them...they can handle that, that is their problem.... if they are truly good, they will be able to to work with you and will probably be glad that they got to you before someone with less skill could mess things up which they have to fix:)
 

Bailamosdance

Well-Known Member
#27
No teacher is responsible for the quality of their students in that their teaching my be exemplary but the student might just be mediocre. High quality dancers attract many but that does not mean that they only attract talent...
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#28
No teacher is responsible for the quality of their students in that their teaching my be exemplary but the student might just be mediocre. High quality dancers attract many but that does not mean that they only attract talent...
May be, but if they attract a statistically meaningful number of students, they ought to have a FEW who are demonstrating some talent. If the overwhelming majority of a teacher's students aren't displaying any grasp of technique, it does make you wonder if he/she is catastrophically unlucky in attracting the inept, or if that's what he/she turns out.
 

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#29
If a teacher has no good students... I agree with Fasc, something is wrong. Partly because just by luck and chance every teacher ends up with a few students with amazing potential and drive. If the teacher never has anything to show for that it means they can't keep the good ones from moving on.
 

Bailamosdance

Well-Known Member
#30
Yes, l, if only the poor quality dancers remain there is something wrong with the situation, for sure. However, judging a teacher by the student results is never going to be foolproof. Students who are brand new, or come loaded with poor muscle memory, or simply students who refuse to ingest the wisdom of a talented teacher can look simply awful, but are not indicative of their teachers work.

I cannot count the number of times that I meet a student of a superstar teacher that proceeds to dance poorly, all the while insisting that their teacher works with them almost daily, while another student of the same teacher is much better while saying simply that they work with that same teacher, although much less often.
 

debmc

Well-Known Member
#32
However, judging a teacher by the student results is never going to be foolproof. Students who are brand new, or come loaded with poor muscle memory, or simply students who refuse to ingest the wisdom of a talented teacher can look simply awful, but are not indicative of their teachers work.
On the other hand, a good teacher will probably not have the students who have poor muscle memory, can't ingest wisdom, etc, etc, compete in the bigger comps where they are going to look ( and feel) bad. I think a good teacher may have some students that have trouble learning, but they usually guide those students to the appropiate comps at the appropriate levels.
 
#34
well here's an update on my situation... Today I took another workshop with the standard teacher who is really good and found out that he charges $130 for 50 minutes so I guess that dream has just been destroyed. But at the end of the workshop he said that my friend and I (we are both latin kinda girls, but really want to be ten dancers) should take lessons with this other (cheaper less experienced but still a pretty good instructor) standard teacher at the studio and have him help us learn the basics and learn routines and then we would take the lessons together so we would split the cost of $60. He thinks we have potential to be standard dancers and thinks we are at a good age. The awesome standard teacher then suggested that once we get our routines down we can have a lesson once a month with him or his lovely partner (who charges $95/50 mins) and we could split the cost. Also a new latin teacher just started at my studio. All that I have seen of him has been very good and my friend had to take a lesson with him (long story) and she said he was a really good teacher and helped a lot with her technique in the hour they had. So I am considering switching to taking lessons with the new guy.

So if this all worked out how i explained above... I would be taking a latin lesson with the new guy every other week... and the weeks I don't have a latin lesson I'll have a (somewhat) private lesson that I split the cost with my friend with the standard guy who will help us get the basics and bronze routines down.... then once the routines are done and good once a month we would split the cost of a lesson with the really good standard man's partner who is equally as fabulous and talented

What do yall think of this plan?
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#36
I agree, he'd have to be REALLY good with a serious national reputation for me to pay that kind of money. Good news on the Latin front, though!
 
#37
Yeah $130 is a lot and it's too much for me... I can't afford that much especially for only 50 mins. which is why if I want to learn standard I need to go with the other guy who the by the way $130 instructor recommended. And yeah he does have a serious national reputation in the amateur realm/world/league whatever you want to call it. And he went pro not too long ago and he does have a name in pro too. He really is great. My only confusion is why he is $130 and his partner who has obviously won the same championships/competitions as he has is $95... makes no sense to me
 

twnkltoz

Well-Known Member
#38
Sounds like a good plan, but I am interested in the price difference as well. Maybe because male teachers are in more demand so he figures he can charge more?
 

danceronice

Well-Known Member
#39
...Let me put it this way, I have paid less per hour for VERY long record of high-level success as an am and a pro AND a teacher. Unless you're in NYC, where everything costs more than it's worth, $130 to me is veering into 'coach' level pricing (ie established judges on a national/international level.) In fact that's more per hour than the Olympic-level skating coaches whose rates I know. It just sounds like an awful lot except for a very, very short list of names most of us would know. Unless it's the opposite of NYC and a captive-market setting, where he's the only game in town.
 

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