how are your lessons going? thread II

#61
Peter Eggleton is amazing! I had a coaching with him a couple of weeks ago. I tried to post about it before, but the board was acting up. That said, I wrote plenty of notes afterwards; he gave a lot of information and now I'm working on applying it to my dancing. He knows exactly how to convey the information he gives as to what he wants to see in your dancing, making complex concepts very clear. He's a brilliant coach and the nicest person.
 
#64
Last night DW and I went back to the roots so we worked on Rumba and making sure of the timing and went to move the feet and when to move the body. So our teacher to get his point a cross told me to count 1 - Stop - 3 - 4 and that made so much of difference it made my body make motions that I only dream about.

So I have been practicing yesterday after the lesson and this morning here at the office; Co-workers looking at me funny but they know I Ballroom Dance. The lesson was one of those lessons that the light went on and made so many things he said or told me to do so much clear.
 
#65
I've been scrutinizing the Eggleton tapes and I think the reason he is so smooth is that he works his ankles like crazy, Brenda is a lot shorter than he is so his knees are permanently bent - which helps with smoothness but I think he is up on his feet a lot of the time..... any thoughts?
 

Josh

Active Member
#66
So I have been practicing yesterday after the lesson and this morning here at the office; Co-workers looking at me funny but they know I Ballroom Dance.
lol, been there ricky! Those funny looks are really looks of curiosity and intrigue in most cases, and even envy ;-)
 

Josh

Active Member
#67
I've been scrutinizing the Eggleton tapes and I think the reason he is so smooth is that he works his ankles like crazy, Brenda is a lot shorter than he is so his knees are permanently bent - which helps with smoothness but I think he is up on his feet a lot of the time..... any thoughts?
Sounds good to me elise. Any great dancer will work the heck out of the ankles... these are the "shock absorbers" of the body, and good smooth dancing even at a beginner level requires some use of them. Especially when lowering, a smooth motion is only possible through proper ankle articulation.
 
#68
lol, been there ricky! Those funny looks are really looks of curiosity and intrigue in most cases, and even envy ;-)
What is even funny I am re-arranging my office so I can have more room to practice. I even figure out how to practice some basic smooth steps in my office. For now I will be doing that rumba even in the hall-ways until it becomes second nature.
 

tangotime

Well-Known Member
#69
I've been scrutinizing the Eggleton tapes and I think the reason he is so smooth is that he works his ankles like crazy, Brenda is a lot shorter than he is so his knees are permanently bent - which helps with smoothness but I think he is up on his feet a lot of the time..... any thoughts?


Actually , she wasnt that much-- its an illusion from his positioning of the lady-- and , the style you are looking at, was very prevalent at that period of time .
As to the comment about his feet-- he has always been a strong advocator of the " flexible " ankle .

As to his smoothness-- that was a quality that 98% of the pros. in that time period displayed .That was a constant reminder from all of my coaches and teachers .

It ( Slow trot ) seemed to portray an effortlessness , and to have a more langorous look than that which todays proponents show .
 
#70
Sounds good to me elise. Any great dancer will work the heck out of the ankles... these are the "shock absorbers" of the body, and good smooth dancing even at a beginner level requires some use of them. Especially when lowering, a smooth motion is only possible through proper ankle articulation.
We (DP and I) looked though one of the tapes together and the other noticable thing is that they pay as much attention to the links between steps as they do to the steps themselves. I suppose that is obvious once stated but its not how one usually learns and even though you can not do a sequence without it, one tends to create an emotive, if you will, dancing gap between each step. I liken it to cursive instead of printed writing - where each letter is a step and each word a musical phrase. We worked on that today: dancing between the learned steps in a much more continuous manner.
 

cornutt

Well-Known Member
#71
My instructor is about to have surgery and will be out for 6-8 weeks. :-( I'm working out what I'm going to do during the time. I could take some lessons with my DW and her (male) instructor. Or I could work with another (female) instructor at the studio. Or a bit of both. I'm trying to think through what I'd like to accomplish over the next couple of months, so I can decide which course to pursue.

I think I'd like to spend most of the time on smooth. But the female instructor, although she does smooth, I think she prefers to teach rhythm. And one thing I'd particularly like to do is start doing some quickstep, and I don't think she has ever instructed in quickstep. On the other hand, she is very capable at choreography, and one of my goals for 2008 is to choreograph and learn a routine to a particular song, part of which will involve some quickstep. The male instructor is very experienced at quickstep, but I don't think my DW wants to learn it right now.

The other thing I'd like to do is learn some proper samba. The female instructor is very qualified to teach samba. But I don't know when I will get a chance to actually dance it -- there's a line dance that is done to samba music which is very popular at our studio, and somehow I've become the de facto caller/leader for it. :shock:
 

mamboqueen

Well-Known Member
#73
At a lot of pro/am comps, you can do "American" (rythym) style samba. I think the syllabus steps are somewhat different (although I have never taken American samba...I have danced with some who have and there are some patterns that I've never seen in latin).
 

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