Parenting quandary(s) Need input

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
I completely agree with this point of view.

I'm also going to tell you that one of the more famous recent alums from the college where I work is the lead system designer for World of Warcraft. A lot of people would probably assume he was a Computer Science major. Nope. Biology and Philosophy. It gets even better: he got a PhD in Marine Sciences and was a professor at a research university. Then he got sick of spending so much time applying for grants and did a massive career change. He had NO experience in game writing when he started...but he was bright and adaptable.

The president of my college cites a statistic that the average person will have seven jobs in his/her life, and a sizable percentage will have them in fields that didn't even exist when they went to school. The theory, then, is that adaptability, thinking skills, and learning skills are more important than specific knowledge garnered.

Sure, if you are going to med school, it's probably a good thing for you to have done a dissection as an undergraduate before you get to your first cadaver. But on the other hand, you are going to learn most of your specific job related skills in med school.

DS greeted this revelation with shock and awe. IOW, this fact elicited a rare, "That's cool, Mom!" from my blase, blase teen.
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
Along the same lines, I've read multiple articles about economists finding work in the world of MMORPG design. (A quick Google search turns up plenty of results; I didn't click through them--because I'm lazy--to find one of the articles that really stood out to me.) One guy I'm thinking of had had a career in the monetary/financial/economic systems of Europe somewhere, and transitioned from that to working for one of the big game designers. It makes sense--the games employ shockingly real-world economic theories throughout them. In the article, Mr. Guy was talking about how it can essentially function as an econ lab, where real economic principles can be put into practice and tested, all without crashing actual live economies. Granted, they can wreak havoc with virtual economies, but there you go.

When DH talks to me about WoW (at great length, whether I want him to or not, LOL) most of it is boring as [poo] to me. I don't give a rat's butt about gear or damage or battles or bosses or strategy or anything else. But what does interest me is the economic system they've got going on. Fascinating stuff. (Because I'm a dork.)
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
Just putting it out there, P. You are a Dork with a capital D. This is (one of the many reasons) why we love you.

I'm not even remotely surprised by all this, just judging by DS's friends -- a bunch of Big Band Theory candidates. Brilliant kids who unwind by playing massive multiplayer online dealies. It's what smart guys (and gals) do. *shrug* I'm too old to understand the dynamic but it is what it is. Smart people rule the world... or at least parts of it. :)
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
Just putting it out there, P. You are a Dork with a capital D. :)
Yup! I don't even try to pretend otherwise anymore. Heh, one of my favorite experiences in recent years was going to the National Tax Association conference: several days of nothing but presentations about the intersection of taxation and economic theory. Public policy, essentially. I was absolutely in Dork Heaven. And we got to go inside the Chicago Fed! So cool.
 
Just putting it out there, P. You are a Dork with a capital D. This is (one of the many reasons) why we love you.

I'm not even remotely surprised by all this, just judging by DS's friends -- a bunch of Big Band Theory candidates. Brilliant kids who unwind by playing massive multiplayer online dealies. It's what smart guys (and gals) do. *shrug* I'm too old to understand the dynamic but it is what it is. Smart people rule the world... or at least parts of it. :)
The world is ruled by smart people that know how to manage and motivate even smarter people.
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
Not a quandary, just a note that probably fits better in this thread than any other. Not sure how many parents of young children there are in DF, but you never know who might be lurking. :cool:

I heard on NPR late last week that the American Academy of Pediatrics has changed its recommendation in terms of prescription of antibiotics for ear infections in young children. it's now recommending that antibiotics be prescribed only after time has passed, in which the infection might clear up on its own. An exception would be made for severe infections (the news story gave details of what severe means, but I don't remember.)

During the story, the issue was raised of how this might affect working parents. No way you could take a feverish, screaming infant to daycare, for example. There was, IMHO, no good answer for that one. The other issue that was raised was the hassle and expense of having to make multiple doctor visits for one illness. The answer to that? Parents might be given a script, "just in case" the infection doesn't clear up on its own in a few days. Hmm. i have my thoughts on that, too, but I should probably keep my mouth shut.

In any case, just wanted to share the info with parents of young/youngish children. the next time your little 'un gets sick, they might get slightly different treatment at the pediatrician.
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
I should probably add that, even though it wasn't an ear infection and DS is by no means an infant, I went through this very thing with DS last week. We knew he was seriously ill by Saturday night/ Sunday morning, but opted to wait it out and see if he could throw off the infection on his own. He couldn't.

If I'd taken DS to the doctor when I first knew he was sick, he'd have missed one, maybe two, days of school. I followed the AAP guidelines and waited before getting antibiotics. He missed five days of school.

Sucks. Short answer: Work on improving your immune system, so you don't get sick. *sigh*
 
There are good health arguments for being very conservative with the use of antibiotics. These include the risk of superbugs developing if the full course isn't followed (quite common that people stop taking them once symptoms subside), and they play merry hell with the microbiome, your ecosystem of passengers that provide all sorts of benefits when correctly populated and working correctly.

I have become a fan of megadoses of Vitamin D3. I don't get much sun. Until I started the D3 megadoses, I was getting wretched colds every winter (I have a small disease vector child at home.) Since taking a minimum of 5000 IU per day of D3, I haven't caught a cold in the last 4 years.
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
Yes. I understand why the recommendation is to go easy on antibiotics. When DS was an infant, he got so many ear infections that the pediatrician stopped prescribing the first level antibiotic. She went straight for Augmentin every time. That's not good. What if he'd gotten seriously ill? What would she have been able to prescribe, since she'd already pulled out the big guns, so to speak?

It's just hard to be a working parent of a screaming infant, with a prescription in hand, who is supposed to wait it out, knowing that relief is mere hours away, if you give the baby the meds. I think that, danger of super bugs notwithstanding, most parents would cave in and medicate. I could be wrong, of course. :D

DS relapsed after one day back at school, btw. The PA at urgent care thinks he may have developed pneumonia; off to the doctor or perhaps ER later today to find out. This time, I want to get him the big time drugs. It sounds like he's going to cough up an internal organ. *sigh* When we get this cleared up, whatever it is, I'll look into getting him some dietary supplements to boost his immune system. That's a valuable observation. I appreciate it.
 
You've got to do what it takes to get through. Wasn't trying to criticize parents that go the route of medicating. Always better to do it informed of all the options and why, though.
 

samina

Well-Known Member
Thumbs up on the D3 supplements. Have good things to say about those, which I take regularly.

Just spent 5 days on my back with an extremely aggressive respiratory thing -- whatever it was, it came blasting with AK47s. That I'm bouncing back from it without having taken antibiotics or steroidal meds, I'll give general credit to the D3 and other helpful things I take to jack up my immune system. But gee whiz, didn't it just get a run for my money...
 

pygmalion

Well-Known Member
Yes. I agree with both of you. Funny thing is, when I had DS at the doctor last week, I was sick, too, but opted out of getting myself treated. I'd rather wait for my body to heal itself, if it's going to. Learned that when I was pregnant with DS and took ZERO medicine, unless you count lots of purified water as medicine (which some people might. ;) )


I just didn't want to come across as if I'm condemning parents who give their babies the meds. BTDT. It is horrible to have a five-month (or five-year or fifteen-year old) child in pain. All you want to do is ease their suffering.

I just wanted to share the info. I am glad that the AAP standards have changed. I think it's been way too easy for me to get prescription drugs for DS. Sometimes he's really needed meds; other times meds were convenient for the doctors and for me.

I wish our society was more like societies in some other parts of the world, where working parents get support for taking care of sick kids. Here, it's hit or miss, but, IMHO, far too often miss. *sigh*
 

NURDRMS

Well-Known Member
Bought my 16 yo daughter her first cell phone for her birthday. Yes, I know. Many of you are thinking, "She's 16 and is just now getting a cell???" But I saw no reason for her to have a phone until she started driving. Call me old-fashioned. Anyway, they have this cool feature that lets you locate the phone wherever in the world it is. AND, even better, will give you a geographic plot of where it's been for the past seven days. With my first daughter I dreamed of being able to implant a locator chip into her body so I could see if she really was where she was supposed to be. Now, 15 years later, I have such a locator for my youngest daughter, which might as well be implanted since I'm sure there's no way she's going to let that phone out of her grip. This really is the coolest thing. It's like growing up in my small hometown and everyone knows you (and tells your mom where you've been) only now it's all electronic!
 

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