Sacadas for Dummies

Mladenac

Well-Known Member
#21
Maybe we're having a semantic disagreement, as so often happens.

I agree there is no kick. I do not agree there is no contact between legs, ankles or feet.

I don't know why a couple on a social dance floor would do a movement that has no contact and purely gives illusion. Especially when there is so much potential for very nice contact between the partners.
I don't want to have a contact in legs while performing sacada cause it would alter flowing line of a free leg therefore
it would be more difficult to anticipate further leg movement. :)

Leg contact may happen but it's not a primary motive of doing sacada.
My primary motive is give a sensation of flying free leg. ;)
 

Mladenac

Well-Known Member
#22
some sacadas do require contact; linear ones for instance; the follower's leg is displaced from the path it would have taken, but circular ones arising from a giro, contact is optional.
I don't even use contact in linear ones maybe accidentaly.
I go with my torso into the space first so sacada happens.
It's very important to be sensitive about leading in with a torso,
if not properly some kind of contact might happen.

Sacada is rather advanced movement cause feeling of followers movement is required.
I would add that when I lead sacada I try to follow partner into her movement more carefully cause
I don't want to influence her balance.
 

bordertangoman

Well-Known Member
#23
I don't even use contact in linear ones maybe accidentaly.
I go with my torso into the space first so sacada happens.
.
Then you don't understand; if you are walking in a straight line and she is in front of you, what would cause her leg to move other than a normal step?

answer; your leg displacing hers; minimal torso involvement.

you could after add some torso movement to create a boleo or her to cross behind, or you could leave those things out and just get a small movement of her leg.

Her balance won't be affected; if her leg is relaxed at the hip.
 

Mladenac

Well-Known Member
#24
Then you don't understand; if you are walking in a straight line and she is in front of you, what would cause her leg to move other than a normal step?
What does straight line mean in forward walking means to you?
I don't get enough information from your post to understand what you mean.
 

UKDancer

Well-Known Member
#26
For me, there is an illusion in a sacada, and it is that is of the intruding leg directly creating the displacement and resulting swing of the partner's leg.

I think more in terms of moving bodily into a space which my partner hasn't quite finished with, as [she] moves to a new place. The placing of my intruding leg prevents the collection of my partner's feet following her resulting step by the most direct route: my own leg is in between, and the leg has to take a longer path around. I usually do aim for some gentle leg contact, but it was the commitment of my upper body into a place being departed from by my partner that actually creates the need to swing the leg somewhat, and if I've timed it right (and it's painful disaster if I get there early), there is no weight remaining in my partner's leg by the time we 'meet'. I use my leg as a gentle lever, but the leverage comes from my body (as does the lead for everything else) ...
 
#30
Funny, that video of 'linear' sacadas is one type for which I got applause for doing when I took a series of 'Nuevo' classes...but, it never helped me as I only dance close embrace and never break the embrace....I'm not able to do a single sacada consistently with confidence. I just occasionally come close.. perhaps, someone could suggest which sacada would be the easiest to first master in close-embrace? (note: I've been dancing for over four years and I'm not bad at all... many times, partners have told me that I'm the most musical dancer in the room.)
 

UKDancer

Well-Known Member
#32
perhaps, someone could suggest which sacada would be the easiest to first master in close-embrace?
Lead the follower to a cross while in cross system, and while she crosses LF over RF, cross your own LF behind your RF. Then lead the follower to uncross into a giro to her R, starting with her RF to side (then LF back). Just as she lands her RF and before she starts to collect her LF towards her RF, step with your own LF fwd, making gentle contact with her trailing L leg, causing it to swing out, a little, before continuing back into the giro. It works fine in a more open embrace too.
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
#33
...perhaps, someone could suggest which sacada would be the easiest to first master in close-embrace?...
I think the very first sacada shown in the video is easy to do in close embrace. Maybe it's even easier in close embrace, because the leader is so close to his partner.

Another easy one is similar to the one above, but with the leader walking to the partner's left side.
 
#34
Lead the follower to a cross while in cross system, and while she crosses LF over RF, cross your own LF behind your RF. Then lead the follower to uncross into a giro to her R, starting with her RF to side (then LF back). Just as she lands her RF and before she starts to collect her LF towards her RF, step with your own LF fwd, making gentle contact with her trailing L leg, causing it to swing out, a little, before continuing back into the giro. It works fine in a more open embrace too.
thank you, I'm thinking there's a typo here and you mean to say; 'step with your own RF fwd,'
 
#35
I think the very first sacada shown in the video is easy to do in close embrace. Maybe it's even easier in close embrace, because the leader is so close to his partner.
Another easy one is similar to the one above, but with the leader walking to the partner's left side.
Walking cross footed and sort of leaning out to the side you are stepping with and nudging the woman's standing leg. ?
 
#36
What I believe I've learned so far is that I have to pay much more attention to my upper torso and less to my leg. mil gracias
 

Peaches

Well-Known Member
#38
Funny, that video of 'linear' sacadas is one type for which I got applause for doing when I took a series of 'Nuevo' classes...but, it never helped me as I only dance close embrace and never break the embrace....I'm not able to do a single sacada consistently with confidence. I just occasionally come close.. perhaps, someone could suggest which sacada would be the easiest to first master in close-embrace? (note: I've been dancing for over four years and I'm not bad at all... many times, partners have told me that I'm the most musical dancer in the room.)
Linear sacadas (what was shown in the video) are perfectly doable in close embrace.
 

AndaBien

Well-Known Member
#39
Walking cross footed and sort of leaning out to the side you are stepping with and nudging the woman's standing leg. ?
I'm not sure what you mean by "leaning out". I wouldn't say that about doing sacadas.

Standing leg could be misunderstood in this context. You do any sacada on the leg that was the standing leg a moment before, but is no longer.
 

dchester

Moderator
Staff member
#40
Funny, that video of 'linear' sacadas is one type for which I got applause for doing when I took a series of 'Nuevo' classes...but, it never helped me as I only dance close embrace and never break the embrace....I'm not able to do a single sacada consistently with confidence. I just occasionally come close.. perhaps, someone could suggest which sacada would be the easiest to first master in close-embrace? (note: I've been dancing for over four years and I'm not bad at all... many times, partners have told me that I'm the most musical dancer in the room.)
Mario, are you talking about sacadas while walking, sacadas in a turn (giro), or both?
 

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