To specialize or not to specialize?

Leon Theou

Active Member
#81
Maybe it would be more attainable for American style 9-dancers, simply because of the lower sheer numbers of people that need to be beat. National champions in two styles, also more attainable, over world champions.
It would not surprise me for a couple to be at the top of both Rhythm and 9-dance, simply because in 9-dance, Rhythm is weighted more heavily than Smooth (if only by 1/9 of the result). In fact, in a three-way showdown between the top couple in Smooth, Rhythm, and 9-dance, the Rhythm couple would take 1st (assuming the specialized couples would place 1st in their style and 3rd in the other, with the 9-dancers taking 2nd across the board).
 

Sania

Well-Known Member
#82
I think that's a very good point. If you do more than one style, you can expect your progress to be slower compared to someone who spends same amount of time as you do on just one style.
I don't think that is necessarily the case - there are skills that transfer and skills that are learned more easily in one style or the other - for me, as one example, the strength and body awareness I gained in my abs through doing latin (and also crunches at the gym, but that's another topic :)) have helped my posture and stretch in standard.
 
#84
but again, the whole point of ten dance is to be awesome at ten dance relative to those who dance ten, so I cannot fathom why folks keep harping that you won't be as good as people who just do one style at that one style...okay...so what?....
I think because there aren't as many competitions which have 10 dance events, and so couples doing both styles enter separate competitions in both styles, and they do end up placing closer to the top in their stronger style, and probably somewhere in the bottom-to-middle of the pack in their weaker style, but they rarely come out on the top in both of them, they get beaten by couples who focus on one style.
 

scullystwin42

Well-Known Member
#86
Just popping in to say this is a really interesting thread. I do smooth and rhythm pro-am, but have often considered specializing due to budget. Lots of food for thought here. I haven't specialized in one yet because I enjoy both styles and I can't decide which one I would rather specialize in.
 

ajiboyet

Well-Known Member
#88
I think because there aren't as many competitions which have 10 dance events, and so couples doing both styles enter separate competitions in both styles, and they do end up placing closer to the top in their stronger style, and probably somewhere in the bottom-to-middle of the pack in their weaker style, but they rarely come out on the top in both of them, they get beaten by couples who focus on one style.
Patryk and Anna placed 9th in Latin and 1st in Ballroom at the Internationals.
 

ajiboyet

Well-Known Member
#89
I did leave out tap in my response for a reason! But again, my main point is that it's not generally considered necessary or even useful to learn other dance styles if your primary style is ballet; most ballet instructors would say it's better to spend the extra time on ballet instead.
Here's what I think: ballet is higher up on the dance discipline spectrum than anybody else. So taking ballet would help your contemporary, but taking contemporary might not help your ballet.

I may be wrong.
 

Warren J. Dew

Well-Known Member
#92
Here's what I think: ballet is higher up on the dance discipline spectrum than anybody else. So taking ballet would help your contemporary, but taking contemporary might not help your ballet.
I tend to agree.

I don't think there's any such general discipline hierarchy among the ballroom styles. There may be in some studios, but it's only studio specific.
 

Janson

Active Member
#93
Here's what I think: ballet is higher up on the dance discipline spectrum than anybody else. So taking ballet would help your contemporary, but taking contemporary might not help your ballet.

I may be wrong.
I understand your point, and for 'classical' styles (Jazz, contemporary, tap) - it can be very helpful and a lot of the practices are similar. Ballroom and latin I see not so much. I've heard mixed responses to whether it helps. I would say moreso in rumba than paso, and not really in quickstep either.

As for specialisation, I can't see the world champion in both being the same couple. Although on a national level I can see finalists in both.
Most Youth couples do both at a high level at the same time too.
 

ajiboyet

Well-Known Member
#94
Alex Pritchard and Chloe Hewitt came 7th in U21 Latin and 5th in U21 Ballroom at the Internationals.
 
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