What happened to business hours??

Dots

Active Member
#61
If I may suggest a different way of thinking: providing a service like instant messaging in all its forms (text, email, Facebook) without getting paid for it is like a bringing free cookies to work. If you do it once in a blue moon, great! People will appreciate you for it. If you do it every day, people start taking it for granted and get miffed when you stop bringing them (and you'd better bring enough for everyone!).

My notary has a very practical way of doing things: she sets very clear boundaries. When you call, she rarely picks up and her message clearly says that she answers her messages during weekday evenings. Boundaries are clearly set and respected, so people know what to expect and as long as her job is done correctly then they don’t get upset.

I know and respect that some professions require a deeper level of commitment, but in my case, setting clear boundaries and not making myself available 24/7 has satisfied my clients, employers, family and friends because I set clear boundaries. So it’s doable.


Then again, I’m in IT and I don’t have a Facebook or twitter account… I’m weird like that :p
 

Hedwaite

Well-Known Member
#62
Basically, we just don't want to hurt anybody's feelings by making them feel ignored, I get that, but once upon a time, people understood that, and the respect went both ways- they didn't want to disrespect our time as the people they pay for something, by taking something (time, effort) for which they didn't pay. Now, you have self-entitled people who say "I pay you XX per hour, you BETTER be bla bla bla". Clear, up front boundaries are good. Very, very good.
 

FancyFeet

Well-Known Member
#63
Most devices nowadays have separate notification settings for texts and phone calls. My phone is always on vibrate, but I could turn off text notifications completely when I go to sleep, or even set up one of the built in smart features on my phone to recognize bed time and automatically silence text and email notifications, but not calls.
My phone is not that cool :(
 

Joe

Well-Known Member
#67
Another option: you can get an 800 number that is forwarded to your phone. It's maybe $4-5/month. Calls to that number get forwarded to your phone; if you don't answer, they can leave a message and you get an e-mail with the message in a WAV file. If you like, you can set your ringtone for the 800 number (calls appear on your phone as being from the 800 number) to silent. So official business calls are silent, while personal, potential emergency calls are audible.
 

DL

Well-Known Member
#68
Another option: you can get an 800 number that is forwarded to your phone. It's maybe $4-5/month. Calls to that number get forwarded to your phone; if you don't answer, they can leave a message and you get an e-mail with the message in a WAV file. If you like, you can set your ringtone for the 800 number (calls appear on your phone as being from the 800 number) to silent. So official business calls are silent, while personal, potential emergency calls are audible.
You have to pay for 800 calls you receive. Get a 900 number instead.
 
#69
Another option: you can get an 800 number that is forwarded to your phone. It's maybe $4-5/month.
Joe might be referring to services like RingCentral, which unlike Google Voice are not free but they're also far more configurable. RingCentral offers various plans at various prices, including toll-free and local phone numbers. Two of my clients use RingCentral to make it appear as if their staff members are all centrally located, when in fact, they all telecommute from various parts of the country.

A search for "virtual phone" will turn up companies like RingCentral and its competitors.
 

Hedwaite

Well-Known Member
#70
I like Google Voice so far. Each time I upgrade phones, something happens so that my voicemail doesn't cooperate with the transition, but Google Voice is always there for whatever.
 

Larinda McRaven

Site Moderator
Staff member
#71
I don't mind receiving the calls or texts or emails. I mind the presumption that I am going to drop what I am doing on a Saturday night to attend to someones business request. Years ago I even received a phone call from a DFer, at 1:30 am... he was calling to complain about another DFer and wanted me to step in to defend him... He called because he saw me online. Who does that???

My husband excused himself from a house party we were attending, to take a phone call at 10:30 pm on a Friday. I waited about a half hour before I went to look for him. I walked in and announced quite loudly... "Is this an emergency phone call? Cause if not... it can wait until daylight. Please hang up."

He just can't not answer the phone. I however can ignore a phone call or email for a whole day or two until I have time to answer.

But adding another number or different email address won't stop people from expecting us to work outside of business hours... and then chastising us when we don't.
 
#74
I don't mind receiving the calls or texts or emails. I mind the presumption that I am going to drop what I am doing on a Saturday night to attend to someones business request. ... But adding another number or different email address won't stop people from expecting us to work outside of business hours... and then chastising us when we don't.
Which takes us back to my earlier point: It's all about managing expectations (and handling customers whose unreasonable expectations are not met). Tell them how you will behave and behave that way consistently. When people complain that you behaved as you said you would, remind them of what you said. And remind them again and again, as necessary.
 

twnkltoz

Well-Known Member
#75
Which takes us back to my earlier point: It's all about managing expectations (and handling customers whose unreasonable expectations are not met). Tell them how you will behave and behave that way consistently. When people complain that you behaved as you said you would, remind them of what you said. And remind them again and again, as necessary.

...which is not so easy with people who aren't your customers.

It all comes back to the fact that yes there are a few things we can do to manage this problem, but I don't think that's entirely the point here. The point here is, people who expect immediate answers during non-business hours when it's not an emergency and that is not the expected behavior in that industry are inconsiderate @$$hats.
 
#76
... people who expect immediate answers during non-business hours when it's not an emergency and that is not the expected behavior in that industry are inconsiderate @$$hats.
No argument here. Often, however, we can modify the behavior of even "inconsiderate @$$hats" through persistent consistency.
 

madmaximus

Well-Known Member
#77
She prolly wouldn't know where the bookmark is... :rolleyes:

LMAO

I kinda knew I was in for a long conversation when she asked what a browser was, and how to get one.

(kinda reminds me of the Dilbert cartoon where Dilbert asks pointy-hair manager (sarcastically) what COLOR he wanted the database to be---and pointy-hair answers "mauve".)






m
 

debmc

Well-Known Member
#79
It does get crazy....how often do you see people gathered together, but checking their texts, messages and FB, rather than enjoying the present moment company? Video taping a concert instead of enjoying the concert? Taking a ton of pictures of themselves at an event, rather than enjoying the event?
 

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